Tagged With open source

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Once of my favourite places to visit is the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California. It's pretty easy to forget that the software and hardware we can use today came from some of the things on display there. But I didn't realise, until today, that the museum also has a significant holding of old source code. That code repository was extended with the acquisition of the email client, Eudora. The museum has been negotiating with Qualcomm for a while and has acquired the ownership of the code, the Eudora trademarks, the copyrights, and the Eudora domain names. And it's all available under the BSD open source license.

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The idea of a multi-user operating system is almost a tautology today but back in the 1980s it wasn't all that common - at least when it came to personal computing. PC-MOS was a multi-user operating system that, like DR-DOS and others, competed with Microsoft's MS-DOS before eventually disappearing at the Redmond juggernaut crushed almost all its competition. Now, Roeland Jansen, Gary Robertson and Rod Roark have put the operating system onto GitHub as an open source project so we can all mess with its source code.

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If you are acquainted with the command line on Linux or Unix systems, you've probably punched in the wrong command by mistake more times than you'd care to admit. It's particularly frustrating when that mistake concerns shutting down the wrong machine, which can happen when you're SSHing into multiple virtual machines. molly-guard is a tool that prevents accidental shutdowns or reboots.

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Gruntier video cards. More powerful CPUs. Higher resolution displays. All this stuff is really important when it comes to enjoying quality 3D experiences, be it video games or virtual reality. But none of it matters if it takes 400 years to download those experiences. Hence why companies such as Google spend a lot of time researching new ways to compress data. Now Google has a new compression library for 3D models -- called "Draco" -- and it looks very promising.

Shared from Kotaku

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Few commercial developers make the source code for their games available to the playing public for obvious reasons. However, for developer Running With Scissors and it's 20-year old game Postal, those reasons aren't so relevant. So, in the spirit of, uh, curiosity, the company has uploaded the title's source, allowing anyone to take a peek.

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Since launching in 2009, GitHub has become the biggest Git repository hosting service in the world and is used by millions of individuals and businesses to manage software projects. It has also become a playground for open-source software projects that often involve a large number of contributors. When there are a lot of cooks in the kitchen, it can become chaotic and scare off beginners. If you are a software developer that's ready to enter the GitHub fray, we have some advice on what to do -- and what not to do -- when you're contributing to a project in a Git repository.

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On August 25, 1991, Linus Torvalds, a Finnish programmer, posted a message on an online forum about a free operating system kernel, Linux, he was working on. It was just meant to be a hobby project and he was looking for some input from his peers. Little did he know that his personal project would eventually turn into an operating system that changed the world. You probably interact with Linux every day without even realising it. Today, the operating system turns 25. We take a look at the evolution of the open source operating system over its 25 year history.

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Yelp, which hosts user generated business reviews all around the world, has open sourced a crucial component of its cloud infrastructure: a platform-as-a-service (PaaS) called PaaSTA. The PaaS is used internally by the company to automate the management and deployment of services that power Yelp.

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We often wish to share electronic documents with friends, colleagues, business or government, and the software application we use to prepare these documents will save them in a particular format.

Any application that later loads the document will also need to be able to understand this format. If an organisation can control the format, and convince people to use it, then they can use this as a very powerful tool to create a monopoly in the market.

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There was once a time when IT vendors shunned the idea of open source. Why wouldn't they? The idea of sharing their very own programming innovations with others was viewed as detrimental to any competitive business. But nearly 20 years on, open source is now in vogue and has been embraced by some of the biggest IT vendors and their clients. So what changed? We find out.