Health

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Gamers like me spend hours levelling up our characters so that they're stronger and faster and can defeat enemies more easily. Why not try that in real life? I realised that I could use this mindset with my health, and was surprised to find that gaming had prepared me to reach my fitness goals.

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We all know eating vegetables is a good way to improve health. And for many years the focus has been on just eating more vegetables, be it fresh, frozen or tinned. But what if there was a quicker and easier way to get more benefit from our vegetables? Can the way we prepare vegetables boost their nutrition? Does tearing or chopping your lettuce makes any difference? And if we chop, does it matter what type of knife we use?

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Europeans use them; 60 per cent of Japan uses them; 90 per cent of Venezuelans use them. They're called bidets: Basins that jet water straight to the parts that need to be cleaned after you've used the bathroom. And according to Scientific American, they could play a major part in living a green, environmentally sustainable life. But for some reason, North Americans and Australians are not on board.

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"I want eggs, Mummy," is one of those phrases that will snap me out of whatever I'm doing and get me running to the kitchen. By the time my four-year-old says that out loud, he'll already have raw eggs in his hands. And if I'm not fast enough, they will be on the floor too. "I sorry, Mummy."

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Personally, I need breakfast. Almost every morning, I wake up early feeling hungry, and it’s only once I banish my morning hunger that I’m ready to fire. By mid-morning, I take a break and enjoy a snack.

I’ve used a personal anecdote because it’s likely that eating breakfast – or skipping it – may simply reflect a personal preference for timing food intake. Not everyone enjoys eating first thing in the morning. But your first choice of foods may contribute to an overall healthy diet.

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It seems barely a day goes by without some new "miracle" diet littering our social media feed. Some are very well known (hello, paleo) while others are slowly gaining traction (the 'blood type' diet.) One thing that most of them share in common is a lack of rigorous scientific research. This infographic pits seven popular diets against the expertise of a professional nutritionist.

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For all the talk of "toxins" in our food, one definitely toxic substance you consume regularly is probably one you're not even concerned about: Alcohol. A new report shows that even one drink a day may increase your risk of breast cancer, although the risk is small.

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From vitamin C and echinacea to warm clothes and antibacterial soap, there’s no shortage of ideas about how to prevent and manage colds and flu. Unfortunately, many of these are not based on solid scientific evidence. In fact, medical researchers are only starting to unravel the range of factors that affect our susceptibility to getting an infection. Now we have discovered that our body clock plays an important role – making us more prone to get infected at certain times of the day.

Shared from Gizmodo

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You've got data pouring in from your connected fitness tracker, your smartphone, your smartwatch, the smart scales in your bathroom and the dieting app you use to log your meals — so how do you get all of this information in one place? It isn't easy, but here are a few pointers to help.

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I know they say you can deep fry anything, but it's not an expression I took literally. Then I find out you can deep fry booze and well, there's little room for milder interpretations. Collingwood's Bendigo Hotel appears willing to stick all sorts of spirits into the deep fryer, with its latest concoction involving tequila.