Microsoft Teams Finally Gets Guest Access

Image: Microsoft

After a three month delay, Microsoft has delivered on its promise to enable guest access in Microsoft Teams. Although Teams was released earlier this year, it boasts over 125,000 users across 181 countries. Now, anyone with an Active Directory account across Microsoft commercial cloud services and third-party Azure AD integrated apps can be added as a guest in Teams.

Collaboration is the next major battleground in the enterprise software business. We've seen Slack add new features and Atlassian launch Stride in recent times. And just last week, Microsoft integrated Skype into Teams.

It seems we are reaching a "perfect storm" moment as our access to data, ubiquitous connectivity and the ability to work on a variety of different devices come together. The building blocks needed for a collaboration solution are now available.

If you're using Teams and want to enable Guest Access, Microsoft has provided a support article to help you on your way.

What I find interesting is that when collaboration software first came to the fore in the 90s and 00s, the focus was mainly on productivity apps and centralised storage. Today's solutions seem to have their foundations in chat applications with the productivity applications integrated in rather than the other way around.

What's your business using for collaboration? Does it really work or is it still all too hard?

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Comments

    Teams looks great but these limited login capabilities are a deal breaker. A lot of smaller operations dont have active directory whatsits which makes this app about as useful as an ashtray on a motorbike

    Started testing it out on Saturday, since we use Skype For Business at work and this seems to be replacing it.

    -Chat with other Teams users is just as it was on Skype, with the addition of stickers, and an in-built meme-making function. No, seriously.
    -Chat from Teams to users on Skype is currently atrocious. Online/offline status is incorrect. Line breaks from Team show as div tags in Skype. Text-only - no emoticons, file sharing, video chat.
    -Teams file storage is pretty much OneDrive - familiar
    -Teams wiki is pretty much SharePoint - just as familiar
    -Can't join Skype meetings in Teams

    Once they get the Skype integration right then I can think about a rollout, but at the moment it's one-in all-in on Teams, or sticking with Skype until the compatibility issues are sorted. I'd rather have everyone stick with Skype for the moment.

    Last edited 12/09/17 9:12 am

      Thanks for those insights - thats really valuable information for those considering Teams.

    We already use Yammer for business team collaboration & communications. Now that it is integrated with SharePoint, it is even better to use. We've tested Teams extensively with several projects, but the general consensus is that there are not enough compelling reasons to switch to using Teams because Yammer continues to evolve and our users are finally comfortable using it as our collaboration medium. That said, if we were starting with no collaboration system in place, Teams might be our choice. I am truly not sure which of the two would win out.

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