Tagged With broadband

Shared from Gizmodo

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The Akamai State of the Internet Report recently revealed that Kenya is getting 12.2Mbps as an average fixed-broadband internet speed.

Australia, on the other hand, is getting 11.1Mbps. But NBN Chief Network Engineering Officer Peter Ryan reckons there is an explaination for all of this.

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We talk a lot about the NBN, but for millions of Australian homes ADSL2+ is still the technology that delivers us Netflix, porn and news about Donald Trump. Such is 2017.

For example, my house is still at least a year from an NBN connection, but I'm also out of contract on my home broadband, and I know that there are better deals available now to get on board with. So why wait?

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With the rollout of the NBN progressing, there have been plenty of people complaining about poor performance after being switched. Given many people were previously connected to ADSL that's a surprise. My experience of ADSL is that performance is highly variable. But with the ACCC interested in speeds and how they are measured, NBNCo is taking a proactive step by looking at the quality of the copper in people's homes.

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Internet service providers are promising they will spend more money to ensure higher speeds for customers using the National Broadband Network, but it remains unclear how much difference that will actually make.

Users of the high-speed network have become increasingly vocal about congestion problems, especially during evening periods when thousands of people are watching streaming services like Netflix. That problem can occur even if customers are paying extra for one of the faster speed tiers the NBN provides.

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Are you ready for Australia's spring rain broadband blues? It's been a dry winter, but the spring downpours are set to trigger the seasonal ADSL slowdown as Telstra's pits flood – drowning the country's ageing copper network. Unfortunately, there's not a whole lot home users can do about it.

Shared from Gizmodo

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NBN needs to abandon copper-based Fibre to the Node (FTTN), says lobby group Internet Australia. In its latest attack, the organisation is claiming it's "essential for Australia's economic and social development" to abandon the technology in favour of Fibre to the distribution point. And no, it says, it's not too late.

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In a recent blog post, NBN Co attempted to justify why it is rolling out fibre to the node (FTTN) rather than fibre to the premises (FTTP). NBN Co says that FTTP is too expensive for Australia, claiming that Australia is not on a level playing field with other countries that have FTTP.

But NBN Co's commentary is misleading, and omits a number of key facts. A more careful and accurate examination of the facts shows that Australia is indeed comparable with other countries that have chosen FTTP.

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The current incarnation of the NBN, which was meant to be better, faster and cheaper but seems to be less reliable, slower and more expensive to deploy has crossed a new threshold - more than half the population can now access Australia's "bleeding edge" mashup of copper, coaxial and fibre to connect to the Internet according to NBNCo.

Shared from Kotaku

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I was having a chat with Tegan the other day about a bit of a sore point - our future internet connection. Just before we moved into our new place, the glorious address checker on the NBN told us that, yes indeed, we would be getting "fibre to the premises". Beauty. But now that we've moved in, our suburb has been "upgraded" to the not-quite-so-fast technology of fibre to the curb (FTTC).

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Last week, NBN Co began installing Fibre-To-The-Curb (FTTC) broadband internet to various suburbs around Australia. (Originally, most of these homes were slated to receive the inferior Fibre-To-The-Node (FTTN) technology.) In all, more than one million Aussie premises are expected to receive substantial online performance boosts due to this rollout change. Here are all the suburbs that have been added to the FTTC list.

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New charging models could mean that congestion on the National Broadband Network (NBN) will be reduced – but only if the biggest internet service providers (ISPs) get on board.

Last week, NBN officially rolled out a change to the pricing model which it uses. A quick reminder: NBN itself acts as a wholesaler and doesn't deal directly with individual customers who need internet access. Instead, it sells capacity on the network to ISPs, who then create packages to sell to consumers.

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The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission has made its final decision regarding the regulation of high-speed internet services supplied by non-NBN fixed line networks - and if they can pass the "NBN tax" charge to customers.