mind your language

Ring Me After You've Been Put Through The Wringer

It’s not pleasant to be put through the wringer, a common metaphor for a draining experience. It’s also not pleasant to see that spelled incorrectly as put through the ringer.


Flares Are Back In, So Wear Them With Flair

Fashion cycles dictate that flares are “in” again. We’re not sure how we feel about this. What we are sure of is that you shouldn’t confuse flares and flairs.


Gist Is Not Spelled With A J, Folks

The gist is simple: gist is spelled with a G, not a J. It’s one of a handful of English words which begin with a soft G sound and are spelled that way. Gin, anyone?


Why We Spell 'Focusing' And 'Focused' With Just One S

Focusing and focused are words that cause frequent spelling confusion. Do they have one S or two? And why?


Shorten Breakfast To Brekkie For Maximum Accuracy

When breakfast sounds too informal, we’re happy to shorten it to brekkie. But what’s the correct way to spell that?


Every Day, Everyday People Choose The Wrong Spelling For This Word

They’re the same words in the same order — but one has a space and one doesn’t, and they mean different things. Here’s what you need to know to use everyday and every day correctly.


Why You Try To Do Something, Not Try And Do It

When we fail, we often say we’ll try and do better. Damn! We just failed again. The correct expression is “try to”, not “try and”.


'There's Learnings Every Week Because We Are Frontiering This'

Conference presentations are often where language goes to die. The comment above — a direct transcript of a remark I heard at a technology event last week — certainly has the stench of linguistic death about it. Can you identify the three horrendous errors therein?


Oh Gee, Phlegm Has A G

Hacking up phlegm is not pleasant. Also not pleasant: spelling phlegm incorrectly as phlem.


The Only Time You Can Spell Harbour Without A 'U' In Australia

Harbour is one of the many, many words which have a different spelling in Australian English than US English. We always include the “u”; the Yanks never do. But there are two fair dinkum Aussie examples where leaving out the “u” is actually the right approach.