Tagged With 2016 election

2

If you look at social media a lot, as I do, you might be startled by how many people were... unbothered by Nazis and white supremacists marching in Charlottesville two weeks ago. In the days after the clashes in Virginia that led to the killing of Heather Heyer and the beating of DeAndre Harris, a good number of people popped up in my social media feeds, countering that "Antifa" and Black Lives Matter activists were equally as violent as the Nazis and white supremacists who came to a "peaceful" rally armed with semi-automatic weapons.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

3

Neither the prime minister Malcolm Turnbull nor opposition leader Bill Shorten was able to claim victory on election night last weekend. With uncertainty surrounding whether either party will be able to secure a majority of lower house seats, talk has now turned to whether Australia will again have a minority government and a “hung parliament”.

So, what is a hung parliament? And what is the procedure for determining who will form the next government? We explain the basics.

6

After voting in the federal election on Saturday, Australians were told that the final result wouldn't be known until at least Tuesday with the possibility of a hung parliament looking increasingly likely. This interactive infographic from the Conversation breaks down how the numbers are falling across the country, with insights into every key seat.

15

One of the most annoying aspects of voting at the federal election is the throngs of party faithful handing out how-to-vote cards. On the big day, 99.9 per cent of the population has already decided who its going to vote for, yet the volunteers are still out in force, foisting colourful sheets of paper on anyone who crosses their path. Here are some tactics to wind them up for pushing their party's agenda and wasting your time.

5

On 8 July the nation finally gets to cast its vote in the 2016 federal election. By now you probably have a pretty good idea where each party stands on key election issues -- but one area you may have overlooked is privacy and encryption. If you work in IT, this could have serious ramifications for you industry. This infographic from lobby group Electronic Frontiers Australia (EFA) reveals where each major party stands on surveillance, encryption, copyright issues and censorship.

4

In 2015, more than 280,000 votes were received in the New South Wales election from a personal computer or mobile phone. This was the largest-ever binding election to use online voting. But federally, the Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters has ruled out allowing Australians to cast their vote online, arguing it risks “catastrophically compromising our electoral integrity”.

8

Dear Lifehacker, I like to vote below the line for the senate and number all the boxes. This is so I can make sure certain candidates will never get my vote even with the shady preference deals going on. Last election I used Below The Line to plan my ballot in advance so that on the day, all I had to do was transcribe this onto the paper. However, this handy web app doesn't appear to be available this election. Is there a similarly easy yet functional way to prepare?

8

Labor’s broadband plan includes few surprises and fulfils Opposition Leader Bill Shorten’s commitment to responsibly increase the construction of fibre to the premises (FTTP). At the same time, it would ensure the completion of the National Broadband Network (NBN) is not delayed further. It also shows the party has listened to the concerns of pundits and factored in their feedback when they developed the NBN policy.

4

As hinted in earlier announcements by Shadow Communications Minister, Jason Clare, Labor’s much-anticipated policy for the National Broadband Network released Monday commits the party – if elected – to move away from the Coalition’s fibre to the node (FTTN) network and transition back to a roll-out of fibre to the premises (FTTP). This was the central pillar of Labor’s original NBN. So how does this compare with the Coalition's version of the NBN? Let's have a look.

16

The National Broadband Network (NBN) has been a sore spot for the Federal Government. The Coalition swooped into power in 2013 and wasted no time in dumping Labor's much-loved fibre-to-the-premise (FTTP) broadband plans in favour of the cheaper and slower alternative: fibre-to-the-node (FTTN). Worst. Idea. Ever. With an upcoming election, the Opposition has promised to bring back a FTTP NBN. If you don't want to read the 33-page document that Labor released (which is mostly full of political rhetoric) here's a summary of the main points and we take a closer look at some of the details.

5

It looks like Australia's third election debate will be conducted on Facebook, with Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull snubbing a proposed Sky News debate for "the media of our time". Opposition leader Bill Shorten has since accepted the invitation. Originally proposed to take place on pay TV, the move to social media should see more Australians have access to the debate. The notable exceptions are the technology shy, people with bad internet connections and anyone who hates Facebook.

1

As part of promoting the Government's $1.1 billion National Innovation and Science Agenda, Malcolm Turnbull has promised $15 million, if he is re-elected, will go towards the startup sector via his Incubator Support Program. This is a step up from the $8 million originally given, with an eye towards boosting the number of startup accelerators and incubators in Australia, especially those in regional areas.

4

With the election underway it's time to try to make sense of the policies. To help you navigate the thickets of coverage, The Conversation's editors have produced this guide to key policy areas. Drawing on analysis from our academic authors, it explains what we know so far -- and what we need to find out.