How To Livestream The US Open Finals

Photo: Getty

The US Open is starting to wind down, with the men’s and women’s singles and doubles final set to take place on September 8-9. Here's how to watch the matches live, online and free.

What time is the US Open final?

The Men's US Open Final takes place Monday, September 9 at 6am AEST, while the Women's Final will take place a day earlier on Sunday, September 8 also from 6am AEST.

How to watch the US Open Finals on free-to-air TV

Tennis enthusiasts can catch it on Fetch, via their Vibe channel pack — or on free-to-air TV via SBS and SBS On-Demand. The network will broadcast all quarter-final, semi-final and final matches.

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How to watch the US Open Finals online

The US Open’s website has the full schedule of what’s happening when, but it doesn't specify which channel you'll be able to watch it on in Australia.

The good news is that Australian tennis fans can still catch all the action of the finals via ESPN, as well as Foxtel, Fetch and Kayo Sports.

Kayo Sports costs $25 a month, but also offers other features like daily live coverage and commentary. They've broadcast the entire tournament, and will also be covering all the excitement of the finals. If you haven't signed up before, you can join for 14 days and then cancel without paying anything.

Click here to get your free trial!

Those with a Foxtel IQ subscription that includes the Sports channel will be able to catch all the action there, as well as via Foxtel Now's sports pack.

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Comments

    Four days into a two week tournament is hardly "winding down".

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