Tagged With television

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Ask not for whom the game thrones; it thrones for thee. This Monday Game of Thrones, the television show that invented death, finally ends. Now you can move on, at least until the prequel starts. What should you watch next to scratch that itch? It depends on what you’ll miss about Thrones.

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One more episode of Game of Thrones left. A lot of people are gonna have some postpartum feelings. I’m going to feel relieved. I’ve spent eight years deciding not to watch our decade’s defining TV show. For a while I felt like an outcast, like Jon Snow, or Arya Stark, or Theon Greyjoy, or Tyrion Lannister. OK so I read the books. But you don’t have to go that far to beat GoT FOMO.

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Way too many people had to adjust their television sets to watch this past Sunday’s Game of Thrones episode. In fact, there were so many Monday morning articles about all the settings you should try cranking — brightness, contrast, gamma, picture modes, your backlight, etc — that you probably have a much different picture on your TV now than before. The battle of Winterfell claims many; your TV’s picture quality is no exception.

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I’m a big fan of gambling. I’m not one to lose massive amounts of money playing poker in Vegas, but I do love March Madness brackets, fantasy sports, and really anything else where I can wager a small amount of cash in order to win bracing rights over my friends, which is why I’ve been on the hunt for some ways to enhance Game of Thrones this season with a few friendly wagers.

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I've said it before and I'll say it again, smart TVs are the worst. The extra software is usually clunky enough to get in the way of whatever you actually wanted to watch, and updates don't come as quickly or consistently as they do on standalone streaming devices.

Most models come with some serious privacy issues as well, since companies often use them to track what you watch. Now, there's one more reason to avoid a smart television: You could get hacked.

Shared from Gizmodo

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Right now is one of the best times to buy a new TV. In early January, TV makers will announce their 2019 sets at CES, so all the 2018 set will be cheaper than usual as companies work to burn off their old inventory. And seeing as all those new, 2019 TVs won’t start showing up in stores until March, at the earliest you’ve got a few months to enjoy your set without being envious of others. But you know what will make your TV even more enjoyable? These tricks for significantly improving its image quality.

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If you're one of those people who buys a brand-new TV, spends hours straining your back trying to place it in your home entertainment centre (or affix it to your wall) and starts watching your favourite show to celebrate... you missed a crucial step. Your television, new or old, comes with a bunch of settings that are worth exploring to get the best picture quality — or, at least, a picture you're pleased with.

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Most old kids TV shows are like bottles of champagne gone flat. Once the fizz of the pop culture moment passes, they’re just vinegar you pour down the drain. But not always. Some shows transcend their moment, by chance or by design, and manage to become timeless. The 10 programs listed below are my choices for older kid-and-teen focused TV shows that even the most jaded modern child will enjoy.

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Netflix is going all-in on Halloween this month, with a new set of original horror and horror-ish films and shows every Friday. There’s also new non-scary stuff, like Samin Nosrat’s cooking show Salt Fat Acid Heat. Here’s everything coming and going on Netflix in October.

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The 70th Primetime Emmy Awards airs this Tuesday in Australia. The event is happening live at the Microsoft Theatre in downtown Los Angeles, and will be broadcast starting at 8am AEST. Here's how to watch live!

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Running a game of Dungeons & Dragons, or any tabletop role-playing game, involves telling your players what they see. Players rely on you to give a sense of tone and ambience, but also to point out anything interesting or relevant to their quest. But they also need you to leave them room to ask and explore. A good game master learns how to describe a scene in enough, but not too much, detail.

One way to learn that skill, says redditor non_player on r/RPG, is to turn audio descriptions on when watching movies and TV shows.

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You’re excited for a new HBO show, but the trailers look pretty violent. You can stand some fighting, but you really hate torture scenes. Or you hate puke shots. Or you need to avoid strobe effects. Or your actual dog just died, and you’d rather not be reminded by a movie. Look up the title on Does the Dog Die?, a site that collects warnings about anxiety triggers and unpleasant elements in over 6000 movies, TV, books and video games.

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The nostalgia effect is powerful. If you’re still clinging to your old-school Nintendo Entertainment System (however you pronounce it) there’s no reason to let it collect dust in a closet or a forgotten corner of your home entertainment system. Your older gaming consoles will still work with your fancy new television, or even your sort-of new television; they just need a little TLC.

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August is a big month for Netflix originals, with the premiere of Matt Groening's fantasy cartoon Disenchantment, season 2 of Ozark, and a new comedy special from Demetri Martin. Here are the highlights, and the full list of shows, movies, and comedy specials coming and going from Netflix next month.

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Broadcast television isn't dead, at least not yet, but the way we watch it is certainly changing. These days Australia's free-to-air broadcasters all offer online simulcasts, but they're not available on every device.

Worse yet, you'll often find that live sport like footy and cricket — perhaps the only things you want to watch on free-to-air — is blocked due to streaming rights deals. As we've seen with Optus' World Cup streaming disaster, sometimes free-to-air broadcasts can save the day.

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Windows/Mac: There are plenty of apps you can use to put on a little light show in your house (or geek den) if you’ve bought into Philips’ Hue ecosystem. My room is full of the company’s expensive colour-changing LED bulbs, and I’ve checked out a few of these apps, but generally don’t need to make my room look like an exploding volcano on a regular basis. These kinds of apps are fun for parties, but not all that practical for everyday use.