Tagged With television

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Running a game of Dungeons & Dragons, or any tabletop role-playing game, involves telling your players what they see. Players rely on you to give a sense of tone and ambience, but also to point out anything interesting or relevant to their quest. But they also need you to leave them room to ask and explore. A good game master learns how to describe a scene in enough, but not too much, detail.

One way to learn that skill, says redditor non_player on r/RPG, is to turn audio descriptions on when watching movies and TV shows.

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If you're one of those people who buys a brand-new TV, spends hours straining your back trying to place it in your home entertainment centre (or affix it to your wall) and starts watching your favourite show to celebrate... you missed a crucial step. Your television, new or old, comes with a bunch of settings that are worth exploring to get the best picture quality — or, at least, a picture you're pleased with.

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You’re excited for a new HBO show, but the trailers look pretty violent. You can stand some fighting, but you really hate torture scenes. Or you hate puke shots. Or you need to avoid strobe effects. Or your actual dog just died, and you’d rather not be reminded by a movie. Look up the title on Does the Dog Die?, a site that collects warnings about anxiety triggers and unpleasant elements in over 6000 movies, TV, books and video games.

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The nostalgia effect is powerful. If you’re still clinging to your old-school Nintendo Entertainment System (however you pronounce it) there’s no reason to let it collect dust in a closet or a forgotten corner of your home entertainment system. Your older gaming consoles will still work with your fancy new television, or even your sort-of new television; they just need a little TLC.

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August is a big month for Netflix originals, with the premiere of Matt Groening's fantasy cartoon Disenchantment, season 2 of Ozark, and a new comedy special from Demetri Martin. Here are the highlights, and the full list of shows, movies, and comedy specials coming and going from Netflix next month.

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Broadcast television isn't dead, at least not yet, but the way we watch it is certainly changing. These days Australia's free-to-air broadcasters all offer online simulcasts, but they're not available on every device.

Worse yet, you'll often find that live sport like footy and cricket — perhaps the only things you want to watch on free-to-air — is blocked due to streaming rights deals. As we've seen with Optus' World Cup streaming disaster, sometimes free-to-air broadcasts can save the day.

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Windows/Mac: There are plenty of apps you can use to put on a little light show in your house (or geek den) if you’ve bought into Philips’ Hue ecosystem. My room is full of the company’s expensive colour-changing LED bulbs, and I’ve checked out a few of these apps, but generally don’t need to make my room look like an exploding volcano on a regular basis. These kinds of apps are fun for parties, but not all that practical for everyday use.

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With this year marking the 50th anniversary of Mister Rogers' Neighbourhood, along with the US release of the new documentary Won't You Be My Neighbour? this past weekend, we're hearing facts about children's television icon Fred Rogers that reveal just how much care he put into everything he did.

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Australian millennials are turning their backs on the big screen in the lounge room, for the first time watching more video on their devices than broadcasts on television. This is bad news for television broadcasters - and it could also be bad news for big-screen TV manufacturers.

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Despite its quirky humour and overly lit sets, The Good Place manages to tackle some of the biggest moral quandaries life has to offer each episode by teaching lessons with some very real philosophy. Watching through it, I can't help but feel like the show makes for an excellent, if basic, intro to moral philosophy class. Here are a few examples of important concepts you'll learn from the show.

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If you've gone to YouTube to watch an unofficial upload of a TV episode, or even a single scene from your favourite anime, you've probably seen the weird things uploaders do to stop YouTube from taking down their videos. Your show might be sped up a bit, the voices pitched down, the video flipped horizontally or covered in digital snowfall. Maybe you suffered through it, recognising that this degraded quality is a necessary sacrifice to avoid YouTube's copyright bots. The bad news is, it was probably completely unnecessary.

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When it comes to televisions, bigger isn't always better. Yes, if you have a huge living room then a giant TV is great. However, if your living room is on the smaller side, then you can end up in a situation where you're sitting way too close to that massive screen, even when you're technically sitting on the other side of the room.

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Ever walked into one of those 'home cinema' showrooms? It's mad fun.

You wander in, sit on those custom leather chairs. Look up at that world class projector and the crisp audio. You imagine yourself kicking back after a long day at work. Ah, this is the life. You sip on a nice cold drink.

Then you look at the price tag and have coronary.

"So how can I do something kinda like this that doesn't cost $AU400,000?"

Uh, good question.

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We're only a month away from Christmas holidays, which means you're likely stocking up your armoury of volcano projects, beading kits, sand art, and other activities meant to keep your kids' brains from turning to noggin-mush over the break.

Shared from Gizmodo

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At New York Comic Con, during the Star Trek: Discovery panel, Alex Kurtzman said something that I've been thinking about a lot. He said that you couldn't do "City on the Edge of Forever" now, because Kirk would have to spend a whole season mourning Edith Keeler.