Tagged With screen captures

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Sometimes what you're doing on your iPhone is just so amazing you have to save it forever. Lucky for you, your iPhone (or other iDevice) has a built-in shortcut for saving screenshots to your camera roll.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

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Capturing your computer screen is a terribly handy trick in all sorts of situations, ranging from creating tutorials to capturing web moments for posterity. Take a peek at the five most popular screen capture applications.

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Windows only: Zscreen is one of a long line of screenshot tools we've checked out at Lifehacker HQ, but it's got a few unique features that set it apart. First off, it's an open-source project, helmed up mainly by one programmer. More important to most, however, is its flexibility in working with other screenshot and image tools, both through its configurable hot keys (working Shift, Alt, and Ctrl keys to good effect) and being able to send screenshots to an FTP server, the clipboard, a custom-named file, or any other image program you've got. If you're pushing your screens to a file, you can set its JPEG capabilities to scale—after a pic is 100K, for example, you tell ZScreen to scale its quality down to 80 percent. ZScreen lacks the features that blog publishers might want baked-in, like annotation and highlighting, but for straight-up grab-and-edit, it's hard to beat. ZScreen is a free download for Windows systems only.

ZScreen

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Windows only: Free application Bug Shooting is a simple but powerful screenshot application designed to make sharing screenshots via email or with bug tracking applications a cinch. In fact, the application is set up to work with several popular bug tracking applications out of the box, but it also integrates with your default email client, Skype, or any other application on your desktop with the right setup. The application supports several markup options and advanced screenshot features—like screen magnification—that we've primarily seen in commercial apps like SnagIt in the past. Bug Shooting is freeware, Windows only, requires .NET 2.0.

Bug Shooting

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Mac OS X only: Freeware application GrabUp automatically uploads screenshots to the internet and pastes the URL in your clipboard for quick and easy sharing. The application installs as a preference pane in your System Preferences and integrates with your Mac's default screenshot shortcuts. So if you hit Cmd-Shift-3 and select an area for a screenshot, it's automatically uploaded to the GrabUp servers and the URL is copied to your clipboard. You can enable or disable GrabUp through the preference pane, and if you enable GrabUp for your menu bar you can go through the history of your screenshot upload URLs. GrabUp is freeware, Mac OS X only. For more robust alternatives, check out previously mentioned Skitch and Jing.

GrabUp

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Windows only: PocketPC app GetPDAScreen takes screenshots on your mobile device. There's no installation required: simply launch the EXE on your PC, and take a screen capture of any device connected to your computer via an Active Sync connection with a mouse click. Save the resulting screenshot as a bitmap or copy it directly to the clipboard for pasting into your favourite image editor. GetPDAScreen is a free download for Windows only.

GetPDAScreen

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Mac OS X only: Dead simple screenshot and image-sharing service Skitch, formerly in private beta, is now open to anyone to download and try out. Skitch is a Mac desktop application that talks to a webapp: sign up for a free account at Skitch.com, install the app, and publish, share, screengrab, and annotate images from your Mac instantly. Great for sharing and discussing images with friends and co-workers online, it's hard to explain just how easy Skitch is to use, so hit the play button above to see it in action. I just started playing with Skitch, and in about 15 seconds I took a screenshot of my desktop, annotated it, and uploaded it to my public Skitch page. Neat. Skitch is a free download for Mac only. (We can't wait to see this one for Windows.)

Skitch.com

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Mac OS X only: Dead simple screenshot and image-sharing service Skitch, formerly in private beta, is now open to anyone to download and try out. Skitch is a Mac desktop application that talks to a webapp: sign up for a free account at Skitch.com, install the app, and publish, share, screengrab, and annotate images from your Mac instantly. Great for sharing and discussing images with friends and co-workers online, it's hard to explain just how easy Skitch is to use, so hit the play button above to see it in action. I just started playing with Skitch, and in about 15 seconds I took a screenshot of my desktop, annotated it, and uploaded it to my public Skitch page. Neat. Skitch is a free download for Mac only. (We can't wait to see this one for Windows.)

Skitch.com

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Mac OS X Leopard only: You already know that Cmd+Shift+4 will take a screenshot on your Mac, but a few more key combos give Leopard users more features. While you hold down Cmd+Shift+4, you can also hit the:

Spacebar to drag the selected capture region around the screen. Shift key to vertically or horizontally lock the capture region. Option key to expand or reduce the size of the region proportionately.

To see the new keys in action, hit up the QuickTime video over at Macworld that demonstrates.

Use new screen region capture options in 10.5