Tagged With photo editing

Shared from Gizmodo

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Whether you're sharing photos on Instagram or working on an art project, the quality of the final image matters. Even if you don't have something like Photoshop installed, you can get your pictures looking their best with the help of some free, simple-to-use web apps - and we've picked out seven of the best for your needs right here.

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If you're a casual Photoshop user, you probably know how to find the cropping tool and have a vague idea of what the lasso function does. But what about all those other mysterious looking icons? As it turns out, they all have something meaningful to contribute to the editing process and can vastly improve the appearance of your photos. This handy pictorial explains what every major tool on the taskbar does -- from the clone stamp to the colour selection tool.

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Chromatic aberration is the unwanted distortion of colours that you sometimes notice on the edges of your photos. It happens because colours of light have different wavelengths, which means your camera lens refracts them slightly differently. Here's a quick fix to compensate in Photoshop.

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Sometimes it takes more than simple colour correction to make a good photo into a great photo. If you have a scenic picture that could use just a little more warmth to make it pop, try adding some extra light in Photoshop with "light bleeding".

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The first time you picked up Photoshop, I'm sure you made some criminally bad decisions with filters and effects. We all did. It's the natural result of learning via trial and error. But have you completely excised your novice Photoshop habits? Here are ten you definitely shouldn't be doing.

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Sharpening a photo digitally can be a helpful way to bring out the textures in a soft image, but sharpening too much can create an annoying 'ghost' effect around hard lines. Here's a better way to do it in Photoshop without overemphasising the hard edges.

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It's easy to become reliant on plug-ins for simple editing tasks when in reality, a lot of these effects can be accomplished with a little knowledge of Photoshop's built-in functionality. Take "dynamic contrast" -- turns out you can do this yourself with the help of PS' Unsharp Mask, High Pass filter and blend modes.

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When I'm editing photos and trying to find the perfect white balance in an app like Lightroom, I often find myself tweaking the colours by single digit percents and ultimately losing my sense of what looks good or not. Here's a silly little trick that can help you "reset" your eyes to gain a new perspective.

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Video: Anyone who takes pictures of people on any kind of regular basis has had to deal with portraits or other photos where the people in them look a little shiny. Maybe they're a little sweaty, or lighting is to blame, but either way it's an easy fix in either Photoshop or Lightroom, whichever you use.