Tagged With image search

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Online apparel shopping service, THE ICONIC, has launched their new Snap To Shop service. It allows you to take a photo of some clothes, either in a store or on someone, and then use that image to search against THE ICONIC's inventory to find a similar garment or ensemble. I spoke with the company's CTO, Zoe Ghani, about what tech they're using to make this possible.

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As the number of images we store on cloud services increases, it gets harder and harder to find that specific image you're looking for. That happened to me just yesterday. I knew what was in the pictures I wanted but there was no easy way to find them. Box is now integrating Google's Cloud Vision APIs into their products to help find images stored on their service.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

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Looking up a recipe via regular search results in hundreds if not thousands of pages to dig through. Perhaps an easier way to find a recipe is to search for the food you want to make then click on the photo that appeals to you most -- something that Bing now lets you do.

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Reverse image search is one of those innovations that sounds nifty but doesn't always have obvious uses. However, it's not just for finding the original version of a photo: it's also useful for hunting down product names, recipes, and even apartments. Here are a few of our favourite uses.

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iOS: Google Googles is a great way to search for objects in the real world based on an image, but it's not exactly the most accurate app out there. CamFind does the same basic trick, but it's more accurate and provides a wealth of information.

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TinEye's ability to find multiple copies of the same picture online is very useful when you're hunting down where an image has been used. You can also use that facility for finding shopping bargains by identifying online retailers selling the same product.

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Creative blocks are extremely frustrating. They often come when you're hoping to produce something awesome but can't manage to find the necessary inspiration to do so. When you get stuck, image searches can come to the rescue and save you from creative stagnation -- you just need to take the right approach.

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A simple but very useful shortcut: if you're looking at a set of Google Image search results, you can drag any image from the results to the area near the search box to make it the new subject of a search.

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Finding the image you're looking for can be a little difficult at times, but Google's similar image search is often a big help. If you don't have a similar image, however, the mouthful-of-a-web-app titled "Unofficial Google Image Search by Drawing" will let you quickly sketch what you're looking for and use it as a search query.

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Windows: You're probably familiar with the very handy TinEye, the reverse image search engine that scours the web for similar copies of an picture. TinEye Client makes it even easier to search by letting you right-click any image in Windows to bring up similar (and hopefully larger) versions.