Tagged With downloads

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There are currently over two million apps available for Apple iPhone. Android has even more. When you throw in Windows, Mac, Linux and myriad browser extensions, the number of apps to choose from is truly overwhelming.

To help simplify things, Lifehacker's experts have hand-picked around 200 apps for Windows, Mac, Linux, Android, Chrome and iOS that every technology user should own. Best of all, most of them are completely free!

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There is not shortage of free mobile and desktop applications available on the internet. Unfortunately, most of them are either rubbish or trick you into parting with your cash via in-app purchases. But if you take the time to sort the wheat from the chaff, you'll find plenty of excellent apps that truly are free.

We're thankful every day for all the free apps out there that improve our lives (and the developers that make them!). Here are 50 our favourites.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

Shared from Gizmodo

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You've stood at a bus stop, or in a line at the supermarket, or you've sat waiting for a movie to start, so you immediately reach for Facebook or Twitter, right? Well, maybe not, because here are seven app categories we've picked out that are a better use of your downtime than scrolling through posts from people you don't even like that much.

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Music streaming is the future, apparently, which means the digital download had a bright and brief existence - lasting from the end of the 1990s to (presumably) the end of the 2010s. But before you erase all your carefully collected MP3s from the disk and close down the iTunes Store for the last time, we've got some very good reasons why you shouldn't.

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Still using BitTorrent to exclusively download legally acquired content such as operating system images or files you want to share privately with friends? If so, you might want to double-check your security settings to protect yourself from what researchers at Google's Project Zero are calling a "low complexity hack" affecting Transmission and other popular BitTorrent clients. The flaw could leave your computer vulnerable to control by malicious hackers, but you can protect yourself by following a few steps until official fixes are in place.

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Chrome/Safari: If you want a gentle reminder not to waste time online - without investing in a full-featured paid app such as Freedom - try Nothing on the Internet, an extension for Chrome and Safari that turns off all the content of the web, leaving a zen-like expanse of empty wireframes.

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iOS/Android: If you're worried about apps tracking your location, it's not enough to limit your location sharing. You need to limit camera-roll sharing too. If you've ever given an app access to your camera roll - to take photos, or store screenshots, or any given reason - you've also let it see where all those photos were taken. Felix Krause, an iOS developer and security writer, built an app to demonstrate this back door.

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The most frustrating thing about a phone addiction is that unlike actual substance abuse, the solution is not to stop using it completely. Instead, we have to find ways to use this technology responsibly, fighting apps overtly designed to steal our time.

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HyperCard, the graphical hyperlinked Mac app that influenced the invention of the Web, was invented by Apple engineer Bill Atkinson after an acid trip 30 years ago this weekend. Now the Internet Archive has brought it back with a collection of over 3000 hypercard "stacks" that you can explore right in your browser. Each stack opens inside the Archive's emulator of an early Macintosh computer.