Tagged With advertising

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On the first Sunday of February, the world's most profitable brands duke it out on television's biggest advertising stage - AKA the Super Bowl. Each company has just 30 seconds to grab the public's attention and stand out from the crowd, resulting in some truly jaw-dropping commercials. No concept is too big. No bikini is too small. No celebrity is too expensive. Here are 25 Super Bowl ads that live on in our minds like horrible, beautiful dreams.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

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When the iconic US snack brand Cracker Jack decided to replace its "prize" with a QR code, it felt ominous. Instead of finding a tiny baseball card or a temporary tattoo, kids are now directed to a mobile game, which lets them share a baseball-themed picture of themselves with the Cracker Jack logo with their friends on social media. R.I.P, all that is pure. Will it ever be possible to shield kids from being tracked, analysed and bombarded with advertising - and used as advertising - if we can't do so with a classic snack?

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Over the last few months, the ACCC has been telling RSPs to ensure that their ads accurately represent what sorts of speeds customers can realistically expect from their NBN connection. But this isn't a new problem - anyone with an ADSL connection knows it's a game of roulette guessing what sorts of networks speeds to you'll get depending on proximity to an exchange, the quality of the copper and time of day. However, the ACCC has put RSPs on notice, telling them that misleading ads will see them come down hard.

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Sex and violence -- simulated or otherwise -- are two cornerstones of Western entertainment. However, recent research suggest that the old advertising maxim 'sex and violence sell' may actually be bad for business.

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In the days before Google, a tiny, cryptic ad in the back of a magazine had a lot of potential. The seller might not be able to fully describe their product, but if the product wasn't very good, that may be a plus for them. Here are some bait-and-switch ads from the 1950s and beyond, and what you'd get if you sent in for them.

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Pizza Hut has announced it will be giving away 10,000 margherita pizzas between August 4 and August 6. According to the company, there's "no catch" - just free pizza. However, before you start salivating at the thought of a delicious cheesy lunch, there's something you need to know from the small print.

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We suppose it was only a matter of time. After conquering the instant messaging market with its hugely popular Messenger app, Facebook is bringing ads to the platform. Pretty soon, companies will be able to buy ads which will be inserted directly into the message app. Lovely.

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One of the most well known tenets of advertising is to "underpromise and overdeliver". NBN Co appears to have taken this concept to the extreme. The latest advertisement for the NBN proudly shows a ping rate of 598 milliseconds. The future is not gamer friendly.

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Google is a massive company that does a lot of things. It gives you email, a cool search engine, a fantastic Maps app and plenty of cloud storage, all for free. We also tend to forget that it's an ad company. Until an ad pops up on someone's Google Home device, anyway.

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Say you're scrolling through your Facebook Newsfeed and you encounter an ad so eerily well-suited, it seems someone has possibly read your brain. Maybe your mother's birthday is coming up, and Facebook's showing ads for her local florist. Whatever the subject, you've seen ads like this. You've wondered - maybe worried - how they found their way to you.

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Pepsi Max will soon be dead. In a bid to reverse tanking sales, PepsiCo has made the unusual decision to re-brand the diet soft drink as "Pepsi Zero Sugar". Apparently, a significant segment of the population didn't realise is was sugar-free so they're spelling it out on the label. (With any luck, this will mean an end to those stupid "live life to the max" adverts. Hurrah!)