Tagged With TID

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People in China have been putting the heart-rate tracking Xiaomi Mi Band 3 on rolls of toilet paper and coming up with a puzzling result: the tracker found a beating heart in the plush roll. It's not only toilet paper that's supposedly come alive either, with social media users finding a pulse in everything from bananas to stuffed animals.

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There are very few people in this world who would wonder, “what would happen if I made a jeep that could fly?” It seems more like the kind of thing you’d make a rough crayon sketch of in kindergarten than it does something someone would actually sit down and seriously draft up. But someone out there, well—they really did try it out.

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Just what was inside the glowing briefcase in Pulp Fiction? It's one of the greatest mysteries in cinema. Quentin Tarantino has remained deliberately coy on the subject, vowing to never reveal the answer. "It's whatever the viewer wants it to be," he once teased.

Except that's not true. At all. The answer is explicitly spelled out in an original screenplay draft. (Spoiler: It has nothing to do with Marsellus Wallace's soul.)

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Overtoun Bridge in West Dunbartonshire, Scotland was built in 1895 for ease of access to Overtoun house. While it is quite a nice looking bridge, it isn't anything special compared to most historical sites in Scotland... except for the fact that dogs crossing the bridge feel compelled to throw themselves to their inevitable demise.

This phenomenon has been occurring since the 1950s, with the bridge claiming the lives of dogs at an average rate of one per year.

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Here's an interesting piece of trivia you won't find in your high school history book. When Captain James Cook "discovered" the southeastern coast of Australia in 1770, he wasn't actually a Captain. Furthermore, he never held this rank at any point during his naval career. Blame alliteration.

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Roald Dahl is best known for writing a series of beloved and critically acclaimed children's books. But before Willy Wonka, Mr Fox, the B.F.G and all the rest, Dahl had a career of a very different sort - as a fighter pilot in the Royal Air Force.

During World War 2, he took part in the brutal Battle of Athens, sustained life-threatening injuries in a crash and rose to the rank of squadron leader. Oh yeah, and he also fell in love with a nurse.

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I used to think classical paintings of Jesus were all the same - if you've seen one, you've seen 'em all, right? Today I discovered this isn't entirely accurate... a bit like the raging erection on a crucifixion victim.

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The camel spider is a type of Arachnid found in most deserts around the world (with the exception of Australia, thank God.) They are notable for having ten limbs, the biggest jaws of any Arachnid and the ability to grow to distressingly large sizes. Oh yeah, and they literally scream while chasing down prey.

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When asked to name a popular toyline from the '80s, most people will plump for He-Man, Transformers or Cabbage Patch Kids. Very few would mention M.U.S.C.L.E (AKA 'Millions of Unusual Small Creatures Lurking Everywhere'). It's the toy fad that time forgot.

Originally from Japan, these bubblegum pink, lycra-clad action figures enjoyed a brief popularity boom in the mid 1980s. They combined everything kids from that era loved - monsters, robots, superheroes and wrestlers - distilled into the size of a pinkie finger.

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The 1939 movie The Wizard Of Oz contains many iconic images. But at the time of release, the most astonishing shot was of a door opening to reveal the Technicolor world of Oz.

Most people in the audience had never seen a non black-and-white film before - and it was all done in a single tracking shot that transports Dorothy from sepia into colour. Today I discovered how this was done.

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In 1993, the world's biggest pop star (Michael Jackson) agreed to produce music for the world's biggest video game franchise (Sonic The Hedgehog - come at me, Mario fans!) It was a magical melding of two cultural icons; akin to Fred Astaire meeting Jerry the mouse.

Or at least, it would have been, if Sega hadn't permanently scrubbed Michael's involvement from the record books. Today I discovered what happened.

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In the 16th Century, over the course of five years, almost 80% of the Aztec population were wiped out due to an unknown disease that burnt through their villages, causing high fevers, bleeding from the mouth, nose and eyes and eventually lead to death. Without understanding the epidemic, the Aztecs named the phenomenon 'cocoliztli', their native word for 'pestilence'.

Scientists have pondered the potential cause of the cocoliztli epidemic for years, but only recently has new research uncovered what may have caused it.

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Most of you have probably heard about the the Somerton man before - a corpse discovered propped up against a stone wall at Somerton beach on 1 December 1948 with no identification and the tags on his clothing removed. But did you know there was an eerily similar case in the 1970s?

With a burned body, a glamorous woman, multiple identities and mysterious men in black, the Isdal Woman mystery goes beyond most people's understanding.