Psst, Microsoft Office Is Basically Free Now

Image: Microsoft

For so long, many of us have struggled to renew our licences for Microsoft Office and have been punished with that pesky error - but now there's a fix. Turns out, you can access it legally and for free online.

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You'll need a Microsoft Office account, as reported by PCMag, which is free to use unless you need more than 5GB of space (up to 100GB of space will set you back a reasonable $1.99 per month). Once you're logged in, check out the applications on offer and you'll see some of the usual suspects from the full Microsoft Office Suite including Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Outlook.

Image: Microsoft

As you'd expect, these versions have limited functionality compared to their desktop counterparts - you'll have fewer colours to decorate your text and graphs for example - but the important part is they're free and the documents will be available on most devices you log into from.

Image: Microsoft

To create a new Word document, head to the 'Word' application on your Microsoft account landing page. Choose a blank document or from a variety of snazzy templates and voila, you've made your first

Accessing previous documents is a breeze as well as you'll just need to head to OneDrive and all your files should be saved and available from there.

Image: Microsoft

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[Via PCMag]


Comments

    The online versions of the Office products have always been free

    What's the catch LH? Usually if you get something for free then you're the "product". Who owns the information created on this "free" platform?

      I expect the stuff you write is not private. I also expect there is discrete advertising, one of many tricks Microsoft has learnt from Android.

      And maybe this could be payback for Microsoft ripping us off for years on office products - just use Google Docs who HL reports to be near perfect.

      Limited functionality and you have to be online.

    LibreOffice

      I knew of LibreOffice but had not really paid it much attention till I was looking to create a few network diagrams. Libre's Draw package and the free extensions of icons available make it an amazing option. And genuinely free unlike the myriad "Trial Only" packages that then try to fleece you into a paid subscription.
      You just gotta love Open Source....

    I'd rather trust MS than Google, Facebook or Apple. Its UI could be a lot better, but yeah, LibreOffice.

      I actually like the UI in the screenshot above more than the ribbon-bar UI they're using in the desktop apps now.

      And definitely, LibreOffice all the way.

    "You'll need a Microsoft Office account, as reported by PCMag, which is free to use unless you need more than 100GB of space (that'll set you back a very reasonable $1.99 per month). Once you're logged in, check out the applications on offer and you'll see some of the usual suspects from the full Microsoft Office Suite including Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Outlook."

    should be

    You'll need a Microsoft Office account, as reported by PCMag, which is free to use unless you need more than 5GB of space (100GB will set you back a very reasonable $1.99 per month). Once you're logged in, check out the applications on offer and you'll see some of the usual suspects from the full Microsoft Office Suite including Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Outlook.

      Thanks for the correction, we've updated the article.

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