Tagged With ibm

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IBM and Nextgen have been blaming each other for the failure of Census 2016. Based on today's Senate Economics References Committee hearing into #CensusFail, it appears both companies were at fault to some extent. Nextgen may have incorrectly implemented geoblocking aimed at mitigating distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks while IBM acknowledged it should have a real test of its router's resilience to failure. But Alastair MacGibbon, the Special Adviser to the Prime Minister on Cyber Security, has laid the blame predominantly on IBM for failing to handle relatively small DDoS attacks that shouldn't have brought down the Census website.

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IBM has been thrown under the bus ever since #CensusFail happened back in August. Big Blue was the IT contractor that was hired to run the Census website, which went down for nearly two days after being hit by repeated distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks. IBM's upstream provider for the Census, Nextgen, has since came out and accused IBM of refusing DDoS protection when it offered. IBM has admitted that it did indeed reject Nextgen's DDoS protection solution, and here's why.

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This year's Census was nothing short of a spectacular debacle after the website where Australians were to fill out the survey went down for nearly two days. Last night, the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) chief David Kalisch fronted the Senate Estimates in parliament to answer questions about the incident. We found out that the ABS will have to spend around $30 million to fix the damage. He also admitted that the ABS made a number of poor judgement calls for Census 2016. Here's what he had to say along with a recap of what has happened since the Census outage occurred two months ago.

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In the wake of the Census debacle that happened this week, there's been a lot of finger-pointing as to who was to blame. Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull has put the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) and IBM, the company hosting and managing the Census website, on notice, expressing his disappointment over Tuesday's website meltdown. Well, he's going to be even more disappointed today as the Census website went down again last night. It's looking more likely that IBM will be shouldering the majority of the blame for the Census disaster. Read on to find out more.

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Recently, I caught up with a friend who works in IT security and the topic of data breaches came up in conversation. He said it used to be hard to convince stakeholders in an organisation about the costs of data breaches; brand damage is difficult to quantify in dollars. But thanks to major data leakage incidents from the likes of Sony and Telstra in recent years, protection of digital information is now being taken seriously. A new report by the Ponemon Institute looks closer at the hard costs associated with data breaches and examines what methods organisations can adopt to reduce that cost. Read on to find out more.

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IBM Watson is a cognitive computing platform that uses artificial intelligence to essentially "think" for itself. A new cloud-based version of the technology dubbed Watson for Cyber Security has just been announced — and its coming after hackers.

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The phrase "cognitive computing" is often bandied about when discussing artificial intelligence, data mining and deep machine learning. But what does it actually mean? During Nvidia's GTC technology conference, IBM Watson's chief technology officer Rob High gave a perfect distillation of this complex topic.

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Microsoft wants to become a leader in machine learning and has been spruiking the wonders of this technology in helping businesses make better decisions. That's good and all, but does Microsoft actually use it internally in its own organisation? Apparently so, and it has saved the company millions.

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A year ago, IBM partnered with Apple to bring iOS devices and applications to the enterprise. The once mortal enemies are now looking to take their relationship to the next level with IBM planning a mass adoption of MacBooks in its own organisation. Is your company looking to follow in IBM's footsteps? We have a few pointers for you.

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The email address as we know it was born when Ray Tomlinson introduced the "@" sign in 1977, since which email has continually grown in popularity as a communication tool for work and pleasure — until last year. For the first time ever, 2014 recorded a sharp decrease in the number of emails sent around the world, from 204m per second in 2013 to 138.8m per second in 2014.

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Attention retro gamers: The Internet Archive has released 2400 old MS-DOS video games into an online repository, including timeless classics like Dune 2, Bubble Bobble, Street Fighter II, Prince Of Persia, Sim City, Golden Axe, Doom, Lemmings, Speedball 2, The Hobbit and Eye Of The Beholder. The best part is that every game can be played for free in your browser. (That's my entire life cancelled for the rest of the year.)