Tagged With web

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Web: When I’m on Windows, I can’t stand iTunes. Even when I’m on my MacBook, the experience is less than ideal. But what can you do? If you’ve bought into Apple’s ecosystem — especially its $11.99/month Apple Music — you don’t really have a choice. Right?

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Android/iOS: I have a reasonable but not overwhelming amount of media: Mostly books, followed by video games, followed by some collectable vinyls and CDs that I keep around. I also have friends who have rooms full of stuff: Stacks of books and floor-to-ceiling bookcases that are nearly bursting from overuse.

All of us could benefit from checking out Libib, a free service you can use to scan and catalogue your books, movies, music and video games.

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Chrome fans might have noticed a little change in their browsers today. Assuming you’re running Chrome’s latest iteration, version 68, you’ll now see a big “not secure” button in the address bar whenever you pull up a website that starts with http:// instead of https://. (For what it’s worth, I’m using Chrome version 67.0.3396.99, and it pops up there, too, whenever a page has a data entry field.)

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Browser cookies are useful in some instances; unpleasant in others. While they can save you from having to go through a complicated authentication process whenever you're trying to access your favourite sites, they can also store data on what you've done on a particular website -- which can then be used to serve you more "relevant" advertising at a future point.

Shared from Gizmodo

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Big fans of the cloud as we are, there's no doubt relying solely on keeping your stuff stored remotely is a risky strategy. Accounts get hacked. Companies fold. And if you don't have backups of your most precious Snapchats and Gmails, then they can disappear in a puff of data center smoke. Here's how to make sure you've got local copies of everything.

Shared from Gizmodo

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These are troubled times for SoundCloud, with staff lay offs, changing CEOs, and talk of emergency investment securing its future for the time being. As with any service that's looking shaky, users will be (and should be) worried about getting their stuff out -- you may have years of playlists, uploads, and podcasts collected on the service. Here's how to get all that audio and data into safer locales.

Shared from Gizmodo

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If your efforts to track down long-lost relatives and obscure musicians (or anyone else you're looking for on the web) stop at Googling their name, you've come to the right place. Here's how to seriously go about searching for people online, including some advice from the professionals who do it for a living. Oh, and if you'd rather not be found yourself, than read on to understand exactly how the pros go about finding those who'd prefer to stay hidden.

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Google's Chrome browser has a neat history erase tool that lets you blitz your browsing logs from the last hour, day, week or month -- or from the beginning of time. However, that history can be useful to search back through, and if you only want to exorcise one site from Chrome's memory, here's how to do it.