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We've all learned about the five senses of the human body: sight, hearing, touch, smell, and taste. And that's it, right? But think about it - your body does so much more than these five things. You can sense temperature, for example. You have an innate sense of your own body and how it exists in a space. In fact we have so many senses that the number is closer to 40 than to five. Here's what we know about them.

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While the world is only just getting used to the idea of driverless cars being on the roads around us, not many know that some of the first autonomous cars were driving around all the way back in 1986. This research culminated in a mammoth 158km trip on the German autobahn, navigating at speeds of up to 175km/h without any human intervention.

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Last month, a tiny remote island in the Bay of Bengal made headlines when an American missionary was killed by the uncontacted tribe who inhabit it. However the inhabitants of North Sentinel island aren't uncontacted by accident: there have been numerous attempts to contact and 'modernise' the ancient tribe over the centuries, and each time they have violent rejected contact with the world at large. Here's what happened.

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The Second World War swallowed up the years between 1939 and 1945, affecting people across the globe and ending as the deadliest conflict in human history. As some of humanity's darkest days, it's origins and legacy are taught in schools across the world. It may be easy to understand who attacked who - but it isn't easy to fully comprehend the scale until it's laid out for you in simple, easy to understand terms.

Just like this two-part video series does.

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In 1979, two years after the death of Elvis Presley, a gold vinyl appeared in record stores across America. The album was titled 'Reborn' and featured a masked man bedecked in an Elvis-style jumpsuit and trademark pompadour. His name was Orion - and his singing voice was eerily similar to the king of rock and roll.

Could it be that Elvis was still alive and performing under a new name?

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As a brown-eyed person, I've always been jealous of people with striking blue eyes, but it turns out there's a reason I never got that genetic gift: It comes from a select lineage. At one point in human history, everyone had brown eyes, until a single person developed the blue-eyed mutation. Every other blue eyed person is descended from that one common ancestor.

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2018 kind of sucks, by any scale of reckoning. It might be the worst year some people have lived through, though older folks might point back to the years of WWII as one of humanity's darkest point. However to find the truly worst year in recorded human history, you have to go back even further than that. Here's when scientists and historians have pinned it as.

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The English language was first spoken in early medieval England around 1400 years ago. This gradually gave rise to today's 'Modern English' which became the dominant form by the 1550s. Today I discovered some of the earliest English words that are still in common usage today.

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In 1967, filmmakers Roger Patterson and Bob Gimlin claimed to have run into a hairy, upright-walking creature while filming a documentary about horse riding in the Northern Californian wilderness. To back their claims, they presented an extremely shaky film shot on a Cine-Kodak K-100 camera that clearly depicts a large, bipedal humanoid rapidly walking away from the camera while glancing behind it. This became popularly known as the Patterson–Gimlin film and remains the most famous 'Bigfoot footage' ever captured.

The 59.5 seconds of film have sparked fierce debate among scientists and Bigfoot enthusiasts, with the unusual gait of the creature often posited as proof that the footage is genuine. Until recently, the shakiness of the footage made it difficult to tell one way or the other. Today I discovered a digitally remastered version on the internet that has been painstakingly stabilised to remove all camera movement. Watch it and judge for yourself.

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Don't you love the internet? It's given people a place to spread their opinions far and wide, no matter how much or little they actually know about what they're saying. On the internet, everyone can pretend to be an expert. There's some good news among all these depressing truths, however: we've dug up the perfect word to be used against these people next time they try to argue with you.

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As an Australian you would have learned about monotremes from a young age: the tiny category of mammals that lay eggs like birds and reptiles. But you never really think about just how weird it is. Well here's something that's even weirder: platypus mothers produce milk, but they don't actually have nipples. So how the hell does it work?

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Ever wanted to live forever? Unfortunately, like smartphones, humans have a kind of built-in obsolescence that limits our maximum theoretical lifespan to around 125 years. Lobsters don't have this problem, however - they basically don't age, though this superpower comes with one big caveat that sounds like it could have been bestowed by a cruel genie.

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The camel spider is a type of Arachnid found in most deserts around the world (with the exception of Australia, thank God.) They are notable for having ten limbs, the biggest jaws of any Arachnid and the ability to grow to distressingly large sizes. Oh yeah, and they literally scream while chasing down prey.

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The Melbourne Cup is sometimes deplored but the central place it holds in Australian mainstream culture is rarely disputed. And its promotion came quickly. Its first running in 1861 drew about 4000 spectators. In 1870 an estimated 30,000 attended and 100,000 was claimed for the 1880 running – about a third of the population of Melbourne. Even allowing for some boasting spurred by colonial rivalry, these are remarkable figures.

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Graphic designers, you should probably stay away from this one. This optical illusion messes with your vision in a way that creates false colours that could linger for over three months - though don't worry, you have to be trying pretty hard to have that pronounced an effect. It's called the McCollough effect, and here is how it works.