Tagged With today I discovered

1

Benjamin Bathurst was a British diplomat who disappeared without a trace in Germany in 1809. In a day and age when sophisticated forensics didn't exist, this might not sound too mysterious - especially during the Napoleonic Wars when murders, robberies and assassinations were common.

However, his disappearance was so notably sudden that many attributed it to a supernatural cause, even suggesting that he had hopped between dimensions. No, really.

1

Overtoun Bridge in West Dunbartonshire, Scotland was built in 1895 for ease of access to Overtoun house. While it is quite a nice looking bridge, it isn't anything special compared to most historical sites in Scotland... except for the fact that dogs crossing the bridge feel compelled to throw themselves to their inevitable demise.

This phenomenon has been occurring since the 1950s, with the bridge claiming the lives of dogs at an average rate of one per year.

1

The Devil’s Pool is a natural pool at the foot of three streams that run through the Babinda Boulders in Queensland. It’s a beautiful destination for a hike, and swimming pools in the area are clear and inviting.

However, venturing into the Devil’s Pool itself is a recipe for disaster - 17 people have drowned in the deceptively lush waters since 1959, and even more fatalities have been unearthed in earlier newspaper clippings.

1

Tesla is a bit of a control freak when it comes to repairing its electric vehicles. If you try to buy parts to make your own repairs, they won't let you. The company views it as a way of protecting its reputation and ensuring quality. But YouTuber Rich Benoit believes Tesla owners should be able to work on their own cars, so he found a way to do it.

0

Oh the Popemobile. The holiest, safest and most odd-looking of transports. Since Pope John Paul II toured the world in a glass box mounted on the back of a truck, the Popemobile has become a bit of a meme. But over in Ireland, you can hire out a vintage Popemobile for your stag do, if that's what floats your boat.

6

Everyone's familiar with déjà vu - everyone would have experienced it at some stage in your life. It's a disconcerting flash of recognition of something you know you've never seen before, yet still feels all too familiar. Less people know about this term's sister, jamais vu: but it's a great descriptor for another weird mind trick that's just as trippy to experience.

3

Ferrari was founded all the way back in 1939 - long before factory robots, fiberglass or carbon-reinforced plastics existed. Today I discovered how Ferrari sports cars were originally built. (It involved hard grit, artistry...and lots of hand-crafted wood.)

1

Welcome to hell! At least, the gates to it. This geological marvel's more mundane name is the Darvaza gas crater, located in Turkmenistan near the village of Derweze, or Darvaza, around 260km north of the capital city Ashgabat. The site is in the middle of the Karakum Desert, Turkmenistan's dominant geographical zone.

0

Some of my earliest gaming memories involve getting all the neighbourhood kids together for a game of Goldeneye 007 on our shiny new Nintendo 64: remote mines, Facility, first to ten kills. I feel like most kids with a N64 or with access to one would have wasted many hours on this game throughout the years - so I was surprised to find that Goldeneye's incredible multiplayer mode was never actually meant to be in the game.

0

Between the cold, the brawls and the literal blades strapped to players feet, ice hockey is already a pretty extreme sport. But what if you were to take it one step further? Welcome to underwater ice hockey, where players have to freedive into frozen over lakes and play hockey with a floating puck against the underwater surface of the ice.

6

Ninjas (AKA shinobi) were covert mercenaries in feudal Japan who were trained in the arts of espionage, sabotage and guerrilla warfare. In the 1980s and early '90s they became a popular subject matter in Western entertainment, with countless masked assassins popping up in movies, TV shows and comics.

For some reason, this freaked the hell out of the UK government.

3

Once confined almost entirely to seafaring vessels, mutinies were later co-opted by writers of all sorts of science-fiction. We've seen them in everything from Star Trek to Star Wars, but one real life mutiny has actually occurred in space. So what did the mutineers do? They turned off all the comms for a day and watched the world go by, literally.