Tagged With lifehacker 101

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Some of us can definitely say we have a sweet tooth. Whether it’s cakes, chocolates, cookies, lollies or soft drinks, our world is filled with intensely pleasurable sweet treats. Sometimes eating these foods is just too hard to resist. But is it actually "additive" in a biological sense? Let's take a look at the science.

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In a feature rolled out to members of the Windows Insiders program just before Australia Day, Microsoft released "Game Mode" - a new feature designed to optimise your computer's CPU and GPU usage for video games.

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There’s nothing quite like the sound of snoring as the ultimate sleep interrupter. But snoring can be more than just a frustration to those in your vicinity. Sometimes snoring is linked to more serious health problems, such as obstructive sleep apnoea. An emerging line of research suggests snoring may directly contribute to cardiovascular health problems.

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Think about something that happened to you this morning. That there, is your memory. We recall thousands of events and procedures every day, but how exactly does the brain do it? This comic-esque infographic breaks down the science behind this essential and primeval mind hack along with improvement tips.

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Hospitals across Melbourne were put on emergency alert on Monday night as thousands of people called ambulance services, reporting breathing difficulties and other severe symptoms. Emergency rooms were so strained that day units were opened to handle the overflow. It was a severe outbreak of the phenomenon called "thunderstorm asthma" — but how does an emergency like this actually happen?

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If you suffer from itchy eyes, a runny nose, headaches and excessive sneezing this time of year, you’re certainly not alone. Hay fever or allergic rhinitis is an allergic reaction to pollen and affects one in six Australians. But when you combine high pollen counts with thunderstorms and warm weather, a much more serious phenomenon can unfold: thunderstorm asthma attacks.

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It’s no wonder people are confused about whether it’s good to eat cheese, when even food experts are divided. Some argue that we’re not eating enough of this important source of protein and calcium, while others say the high levels of salt and saturated fat mean we should be eating less.