Tagged With chrome

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Chrome: If you do all your work in a browser, you can end up with dozens of tabs in one window. You could open new windows for different projects and shove tabs around, or develop the monk-like discipline to stop opening tabs. Or you could manage them practically by treating your browser like an operating system.

The Chrome extension Workona organises your tabs into named windows, which you can easily switch between and save for later. It’s like a sophisticated version of Chrome’s bookmark and tab-sorting features. And it rescues you from tab overload without punishing you for it.

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It feels like every website today wants to send you notifications, regardless of how big or small they are. Visit a page in Chrome, for instance and you'll often start to see a popup box notifying you of new content even when you're not on their website. If you're sick of seeing these, it is possible to rid yourself of them forever... or selectively, depending on your mood.

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Chrome: If you’re a travel junkie — or, better yet, need a little inspiration to plan your next trip — you’re going to love the Chrome extension Random bnb. It’s incredibly simple, but it does a great job of reminding you that there are gorgeous places in the world you can stay at right now and, in some cases, not even spend a small fortune for an incredible experience. You just have to find them, and that’s where Random bnb comes in.

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The standard or “stable” version of Google Chrome offers plenty of handy customisations and quality-of-life improvements, but if you want to get the latest experimental features before anyone else, you’ll want to check out Chrome Canary.

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All browsers: Google and Dropbox are now collaborating on a brand-new "Dropbox add-on for Gmail", which will make it easy to share the contents of your Dropbox directly within Gmail. If you're going the other way, it's also a lot easier to dump files directly into your Dropbox, saving you the step of having to pull up your Downloads folder and manually drag the file over yourself.

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It’s harder than it used to be to accidentally lose all your work. Apps come with auto-save, and Chrome tries to warn you before you close a tab with unsaved work. But hit enter too fast, or suffer a crash, and you could still lose a lot of writing. It can happen to a Facebook update, an application form, or a blog post.

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Chrome fans might have noticed a little change in their browsers today. Assuming you’re running Chrome’s latest iteration, version 68, you’ll now see a big “not secure” button in the address bar whenever you pull up a website that starts with http:// instead of https://. (For what it’s worth, I’m using Chrome version 67.0.3396.99, and it pops up there, too, whenever a page has a data entry field.)

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For someone who writes for a living, my Twitter feed has an embarrassing number of typos. I typically notice them the second after I hit post and am immediately faced with the decision "Do I delete this tweet and pretend it never happened or just roll with the typo?"

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Thanks to faster internet and more mindful designers, websites are mostly quick to load these days. But on bandwidth-restricted and low-power devices, loading times remain a concern. An upcoming change in Chrome looks to warn you when a site is trying to stuff too much down the pipeline -- and let you halt the process.

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It will come as no surprise that, as the editor of a website devoted to productivity, I'm obsessive about refining the details of my tech life to be certain every element is helping me get the job done. While I have software that I swear by (WriteRoom, Deckset, Evernote), I'm more of an evangelist for browser extensions.

My favourite Chrome extensions are lightweight, easy-to-install and usually free, but the effect they have on my productivity is profound. These are the extensions that I love most fervently and recommend most frequently.

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One of the more annoying aspects of watching Netflix on your laptop or desktop computer is the trailers the service likes to automatically play on your behalf. Thankfully, there's a neat extension for Chrome and Firefox that fixes this issue - and a bunch more besides.

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It's a pretty specific issue, but an annoying one. If you're playing around with the latest public beta for Apple's macOS Mojave — as of when we wrote this article — and you're a big fan of Chrome, you might have wondered where your checkboxes and (some) website buttons have gone.

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Emojis are part of our general vocabulary these days, but they're not as easy to get to on your desktop like they are on your phone. That said, you can bring them there, thanks to a feature in Canary, Google's developmental version of Chrome.