Tagged With chrome

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I'm a tremendous fan of dark modes. They're easier on your eyes and your computer's battery, and I think make using sites and apps a lot more pleasant. Unfortunately, not every site offers a dark mode (this one included). However, this week I came across a web extension that can make the magic happen anywhere you want it to.

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It feels like every website today wants to send you notifications, regardless of how big or small they are. Visit a page in Chrome, for instance and you'll often see a dialog in the top-left asking you to allow notifications. If you're sick of seeing these, it is possible to rid yourself of them forever... or selectively, depending on your mood.

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Chrome: I can't recall the last time I didn't install an extension from the Google's Chrome Web Store. However, developers - up until now - have been allowed to offer their extensions as inline downloads. In other words, they could drop a download button on a website, you'd click on it and see a typical installation confirmation dialogue (as if you were installing the extension from the Chrome Web Store itself), and before you knew it, you were +1 to extensions.

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We all fall victim to the dangerous belief that if an app or extension is listed in an official repository - be it the App Store, Google Play, the Microsoft Store, Mozilla's Add-Ons directory or so on - it must be legitimate. After all, the big tech companies surely use a lot of automated systems (and real human beings) to ensure that their customers aren't downloading harmful things. Right?

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The web's more media-heavy that it's ever been, with a great many sites serving images like Sanitarium Up & Gos out of the back of a Black Thunder. This isn't a problem until the image loading clogs up rendering of the rest of the page, causing your browsing experience to suffer. The good news is there's a Chrome flag you can enable to alleviate this.

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How many times have you gone to share an interesting story (or comic) with a friend — a pretty standard process — only to find that the short URL you thought you were copying and pasting is actually one giant, messy paragraph of text. You can thank all the services and sites that append a ton of extra junk to URLs so they can have a better understanding of how you visited the site, what you've looked at and where you're going.

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Browser cookies are useful in some instances; unpleasant in others. While they can save you from having to go through a complicated authentication process whenever you're trying to access your favourite sites, they can also store data on what you've done on a particular website -- which can then be used to serve you more "relevant" advertising at a future point.

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Google is planning to change the user interface in Chrome. The green padlock we’ve taught users to look for when they’re browsing is set to disappear as the company says we should assume all sites are secure. Instead, we’ll see a "Not Secure" indicator when a site doesn’t use HTTPS.

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So you just installed Google Chrome -- that, or you've cleared your cache and history because you wanted to save some space on your PC or fix some website issue involving cookies. You go to pull up your favourite website and, suddenly, a sound starts blasting out of your speakers. The dreaded autoplaying video returneth.