Tagged With webapps

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With audio transcription, you get what you pay for. For a dollar per minute of audio, Rev will give you a well-formatted transcript. For 25 cents a minute (a little lower for large volumes), Trint will give you a transcript riddled with errors, but will help you correct it with a sophisticated editing tool.

And for 10 cents a minute, the brand-new CheapTranscription.io will give you a no-frills text doc with even more errors. Depending on your needs, you might want to use all three. Here’s how to choose.

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A thesaurus is a fruitful tool when you use it befittingly. If you fathom what you’re performing, a thesaurus patronizes you find the merited word for your specific ballgame. But if you ply synonyms without kenning their shadinesses of gist, you will look really speechless. You need to apprehend each word you utilise, or else people will jape and jeer at your calligraphy.

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At Lifehacker we love a portmanteau. A lot of our sister sites, as well as their subdomains, are combinations of existing words: Deadspin evokes backspin but also ESPN; Gizmodo contains gizmo and mod. Lifehacker’s subsites find a second meaning within a word or phrase: Skillet contains skill, Two Cents is money advice. We’ve covered some great tools for inventing pun names before. Now there’s Entendrepreneur, a powerful tool for combining any two concepts into a portmanteau or a rhyme.

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When you shoot a video with a teleprompter, you usually have three options: Find someone to sit and scroll the words manually; set an app to auto-scroll and hope you can keep up; or handle a remote, which costs money and distracts you during your delivery.

We were excited to discover Teleprompt.me, the voice-controlled teleprompter that really works. We covered it briefly earlier, but now we’ve tested it on camera to show you how seamless it really is. No one is controlling the teleprompter in this video!

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There is not shortage of free mobile and desktop applications available on the internet. Unfortunately, most of them are either rubbish or trick you into parting with your cash via in-app purchases. But if you take the time to sort the wheat from the chaff, you'll find plenty of excellent apps that truly are free.

We're thankful every day for all the free apps out there that improve our lives (and the developers that make them!). Here are 50 our favourites.

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Anybody can spew out some half-arsed apology to save face, but a real apology takes serious introspection and sincerity, and focuses on helping the victim heal. It isn't easy to do, but this simple interactive tool can help if you're struggling. "It's good that you're here," the first screen reads when you load it up. It is good.

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My mirror doesn't come to life and tell me about the rest of my day when I walk in bleary-eyed to the bathroom, as much as I wish it did. An always-on dashboard relaying to me my calendar appointments and the weather would both help me start my day with a better understanding of what I need to get done, and keep me from walking through the city in the rain. Fortunately, with a little tinkering you can turn whatever devices you have lying around into your own DIY status board.

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In a press release on the company's blog, Pinboard, the world's best social bookmarking site for introverts, announced it has acquired Delicious, the unwanted step-child of bookmarking platforms, from Delicious Media, the company that acquired Delicious from Science in 2016, the company that bought it from AVOS in 2014, the company that bought it from Yahoo in 2011, the company that purchased Delicious in 2005. Which means you're gonna have to move those bookmarks about learning how to bake a pie, shoot a wedding, or whatever you think you'll click on eventually.

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Naming things is hard, especially if the name needs to be unique. Over the years I've worked for sites named Urlesque (rhymes with burlesque, it's about memes), Slacktory (it's a factory for slacking) and Valleywag (which came scarily close to being called "Boomshank"). I always loved the evocative site names of the Gizmodo network. Sploid connotes splatter, tabloids and explosions; Deadspin promises ESPN with an unexpected angle; Kotaku puts the slightest spin on the Japanese term for obsessive nerdy interest. More famous names like Instagram, Medium and Upworthy also compactly convey multiple meanings. The same approach is popular for fictional character names: Darth Vader, Voldemort and Ebenezer Scrooge read immediately as bad guys.

Shared from Gizmodo

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You've spotted an app, site, or service you like the look of, it's completely free to use, and so you're ready to sign up -- but how can you tell the service is above-board and legit? That you're not going to be subject to nefarious dark pattern tactics or see you or your teens sensitive data shared with advertisers. Before joining a service that seems to good to be true take the steps below. Common sense and a little digging can usually save you from the shadiest apps.