Tagged With solar eclipse

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Last night the world was treated to a total lunar eclipse that also coincided with a so-called super moon. The entirety of the eclipse - all five hours and 17 minutes - was visible from practically everywhere in Australia. Or at least it would have been if clouds hadn't spoiled the show.

Sadly, our next total solar eclipse isn’t until 2028. However, that doesn’t mean we there are no eclipses to get excited about for the next 11 years. In fact, we’ve got more eclipses coming than you can poke a stick at.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

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It can feel nearly impossible to you access a sense of wonder in today's all-the-information-any-time-you-want-it environment, but the answer, I find, is often in the natural world. Whether it's feeling the strange cool breeze that arises during the totality of an eclipse, watching a thousand-strong starling murmuration swirl in the sky, or tasting fresh mango plucked from the tree in front of you, our sensory experience of Earth's pleasures -- even if we know exactly how and why they happen -- can reacquaint us with wonder.

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The solar eclipse may not have been visible from down here in Australia, but the memes certainly were! Twitter was ablaze with amazing photographs and the hottest takes about Donald Trump staring at the celestial phenomenon without protective eyewear. Here’s how the internet reacted.

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In case you haven't noticed, much of the world has spent the day gleefully reveling in full-blown Eclipse Madness. But now that the blessed event is behind us, it's time to reflect. Here are some of the best photos and occurances from this once-in-a-century event.

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You've probably seen a bunch of headlines about a total solar eclipse coming on August 21. It is set to be one of the most spectacular celestial displays of the past century. Unfortunately, everyone in the Southern Hemisphere - including Australians - won't be treated to a darkening of the sun. At all.