Tagged With iOS 12

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iOS: You probably shouldn’t run an iOS public beta on your primary device. But maybe you took the plunge anyway — anything to get in on that sweet Memoji action — and now you regret it. Maybe an app you use every day isn’t compatible with iOS 12 yet, and you want to go back.

Shared from Gizmodo

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Both Google and Apple have started the long tease ahead of new software updates in Spring, with Android P and iOS 12 now available to users who are brave enough to take the plunge (and have a developer account, in Apple's case). So which beta software looks most promising and gets us most excited? Here's how they stack up.

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Apple announced iOS 12 last week and I jumped straight onto my developer account to grab the first beta and try it out. It's been almost a week now and I've been running it on my iPhone X and here's what I've found.

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Now that the dust is settling on Apple's annual developer event, the Worldwide Developer Conference (WWDC), individuals and businesses will be contemplating their upgrade plans. And while, for many, the big question is whether their critical apps will be affected, there's also the question of whether their existing hardware will be able to receive the new operating systems Apple announced last week. Let's take a look at what devices will be supported and, therefore which will be left behind.

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We've heard this riff being played before. Apple is about to release a new version of iOS and a new iPhone will follow. Folks download the update and discover that their previously OK iPhone is slowed down so they feel that they are being pushed towards an expensive upgrade by Apple as part of a program of planned obsolescence. Naturally, Apple has denied this. And what they have to say on the matter is an interesting contrast with Samsung's recently stated view during a court case.

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If you want to play with the "early AF" release of iOS 12, or run around in the deserts of macOS Mojave, you normally have to give Apple $149 for the privilege of developing apps for its platform - apps it will ultimately take a 30 per cent cut of (unless you offer a subscription and keep a user for longer than a year, but now I'm getting minute).

Shared from Gizmodo

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At WWDC Apple debuted the next version of its iOS operating system, iOS 12. After dealing with issue after issue in iOS 11 for the past year, the company's shied away from a visual overhaul, opting to fix what ails the OS and add some features that, while not revolutionary, are welcome additions to iOS 12 (and hopefully mean fewer bugs in the long run).

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The opening keynote at Apple's annual developer event, the Worldwide Developer Conference (WWDC), has ended. Apple has announced updates to all four of their main operating platforms with lots of new features to macOS, iOS, watchOS and tvOS.

While some of the updates are significant, others are less so, depending on the maturity of the platform. Let's take a look at what's new and when you can get your hands on the new software.

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Apple's Worldwide Developer Conference (or WWDC if you want to save a bunch of letters) hits on Tuesday and we fully expect the company to spill the beans on a great many things, including iOS 12 - the next major update for its mobile OS. In preparation for the event, here's what you should be looking out for in particular.

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Apple has officially announced that their annual shindig for developers, the Worldwide Developer Conference will be running from 4 June for five days at the McEnery Convention Center in San Jose. This is the annual event where developers get to showcase their new software creations and Apple unveils the latest versions of all their new software. With the company now offering four different operating systems - macOS, iOS, tvOS and watchOS - there will be a lot to see.

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While I'm the first to applaud software developers who focus on quality and reliability, it's hard to understand how a company as massive as Apple can't weave those qualities into their software from the outset. But reports by Bloomberg and Axios suggest Apple is having their own version of the Microsoft "Trustworthy Computing" moment, when Bill Gates stopped the addition of new features until Windows and the company's other software was more secure and reliable.