Tagged With bluetooth

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The humble padlock has been a mainstay of security for a long time. While outwardly simple, these 2,500 year old inventions have been used to secure everything from loads on trading routes to gates into our backyards. But they've now been given the "smart" treat - replacing the lock-and-key with a mechanism that is activated via a secure app on your smartphone. Don and Bone sell a variety of different Smartlock devices. I've tested their travel lock for suitcases and the Locksmart Mini - which is pretty darn big for something with the "mini" tag.

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Android: Yesterday, Google announced an update to the way Android pairs with Bluetooth devices, making connecting some wireless headphones less of a headache. It's called Fast Pair, and while it only works with a few devices right now, the company is looking to convince manufacturers and add their compatible Bluetooth devices to the Fast Pair ecosystem.

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Bluetooth technology can be a godsend for those of us trying to minimise the amount of cord clutter in our digital lives. But when your laptop, phone, or other device is hooked up via bluetooth to a wireless speaker or pair of headphones and the audio playback starts to stutter, it can be nothing short of infuriating.

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I've been using various Tile trackers for the last couple of years. These thin, plastic devices contain a Bluetooth beacon that communicates with your Android or iOS smartphone so you can keep track of where your keys, or any other device you hook a Tile to, are. Today, Tile has released their new Pro Series trackers, the Style and the Sport, giving their trackers a stylish new look as well as a tech upgrade.

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User interface design is hard, but we've been getting better at it over the years to the point where even a thermostat is easy to use. Automakers, however, seem to have their heads in the sand, taking their design inspiration for their infotainment consoles from old Winamp skins instead of any type of modern interface.

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I am not an audiophile, but I do love convenience. And comfort. And it is quite inconvenient when you just want to use your headphones to drown out the subway and find yourself tangled in a cord like an invasive weed, or when the sound is dominated by the rustling stethoscopic vibrations of said cord. It is more convenient to have no wires at all. If you are also a fan of convenience, perhaps you should try some wireless Bluetooth headphones.

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Ammo containers aren't super common, but you could probably find one at your local surplus store, or on eBay -- and Instructables user r570sv turned this one into a massive Bluetooth speaker with a little DIY spirit and the right parts. Best of all, it's an easy electronics project you can follow too.