Why You Should Run — Not Walk — In The Rain

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Why You Should Run — Not Walk — In The Rain


Do you stay more dry walking or running in the rain? MinutePhysics explains on YouTube the science behind why running is the best strategy if you don’t like getting wet.

This probably isn’t a mind-blowing revelation — the less time you spend in the rain, the better — but some people argue that when you’re walking, less of your body is exposed to the raindrops. We’ve suggested you run in the rain previously, and the two-minute video above should put this debate to rest. The video is also a treat if you dig science and want a quick explanation. Specifically, there’s a formula: Total wetness = (wetness per second X time spent in rain) + (wetness per meter X meters travelled).

(Note: Mythbusters initially tested this run vs walking question and said that walking is better, but when they revisited the topic and tested more carefully, they confirmed that in actual rain, running keeps you more dry.)

Is it Better to Walk or Run in the Rain? [YouTube via Gizmodo]

Comments

    • (Note: Mythbusters initially tested this run vs walking question and said that walking is better, but when they revisited the topic and tested more carefully, they confirmed that in actual rain, running keeps you more dry.)”

      Anyway, I get less wet in the rain by dodging the raindrops.

    • Mythbusters isn’t as scientific as they let on. For one, they don’t test their results repeatedly. Having said that, there is nothing wrong with a little theory to get people thinking.

    • It doesn’t change the outcome. If the rain comes in at a greater angle, it will increase “wetness per second” on account of an increased cross sectional area, but it will have no impact on the second term “wetness per meter”.
      So for any rain conditions, you will get less wet by running.

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