Tagged With webapp

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If you're holding a meeting and only have time to answer your audience's most important questions, Google's free Moderator tool might be a wise solution. The simple tool, originally built for putting together question lists at tech conferences, lets anyone with a Google account create a "topic," like "Questions for the boss," throw a few sample questions up, then submit a group of emails to take part in question voting and suggesting. Given the simplicity of Moderator, there are likely other helpful group polling uses it can be put to. Moderator is a free service, requires a Google account to create question lists.

Moderator

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KuKu Klok is a pretty straightforward webapp—you set a time for an alarm to go off, you choose a sound to wake up to, and you hit "Set Alarm." Kind of like the Online Alarm Clock, but the neat part is that the Flash-based app goes off even if your internet connection drops altogether. Add in the selection of sounds to rise and shine to—including the "Slayer Guitar"—and it's a pretty nifty tool for when the cell phone's out of reach, or you're napping near your laptop.

KuKu Klok

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Postica's a latecomer to the free online sticky notes arena, but it carries with it a few neat features that set it apart. First and foremost is the ability to attach any kind of file (up to 5 MB) to a sticky note, and then send that note to a friend, whether or not they have an account. Secondly, Twitter users can share notes and create new notes on their board, even designating the colour, by direct-message postica. For organising a multi-file project by yourself or in a group, Postica's a simple but attractive option. Postica is free to use, requires a sign-up. Postica

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You might have heard about the power of mind mapping from studious co-workers or, say, a certain blog, but never had the drive to jump in and start sketching. Text2MindMap, a free visualisation web app, makes turning your ideas into node-based maps as easy as hitting Tab. Type or paste text into an input box, using indents to break up your ideas into categories, and then customise the font size, node colours, and more. When you're done messing with your map, download it in JPEG format (interactive Flash downloads are said to be coming soon), and there's no limit to how many you can create.

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Create or browse interactive timelines with webapp Dipity. The service can create any sort of timeline you want, but it really shines when creating a personal timeline; that's because Dipity integrates with tonnes of popular webapps, like Flickr, Twitter, Last.fm, or any RSS feed, so that all you have to do is provide Dipity with a few usernames or URLs and it'll automatically build your beginning timeline for you. After items are added, click on any item on your timeline or zoom in for a closer look. If you're using it in the personal timeline manner, Dipity is essentially another lifestreaming app along the lines of previously mentioned FriendFeed—it just has a different way of presenting your stream. Dipity also supports manually creating timelines on any subject, but if you want total control over your timeline, check out how to roll your own hosted timeline. Dipity

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Web site PassPack secures and manages your passwords (web or otherwise) online. It especially shines on the web, though, because once you give PassPack the password data to your frequented web sites, you can turn on its coolest feature, which is an auto-login bookmarklet for all the sites you've entered into PassPack. The first obvious concern that comes to mind with a service like PassPack is security, and they've gone to lengths to address that issue. Essentially, PassPack encrypts your data before it's even sent to their servers, so not even the PassPack staff will ever read your passwords. PassPack is curretly in beta, free to use, and if you're satisfied with their security precautions, an all-around excellent application.

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Among all the projects available at the Mozilla Foundation, one little application, Prism (formerly known as WebRunner), hasn't gotten much attention. Understandable, in a way, because Prism seems like just a stripped-down Firefox window in which to view web sites—which it is, but that can be a great thing. With the help of a few utilities, web applications in Prism can be just as convenient to launch and use as your standard-installation desktop programs. Let's take a look at where Prism really works and how to get more out of it after the jump.

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Web site Issuu turns any PDF into a web-friendly, embeddable Flash eBook. Just upload the PDF to Issuu and it takes care of all the heavy lifting. When it's done, the result is a flippable page-turner like what you see above. Some PDFs will work better than others for this sort of embedding, and for those pages with text that's too small to read, clicking on the page will zoom in. It's not the first online PDF viewer, but it may be the best looking—perfect for online zines or just sharing documents without sending big attachments. Issuu