Tagged With twocents

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One of the first things I did after my first job offer was call my parents. I ran through the pros and cons, expounded on how it would help my career and marveled at the thought that I'd somehow landed a full time job in journalism, with benefits and everything. It seemed too good to be true.

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Life happens. One minute you're coasting towards graduation, ready to take on the world. The next, you've lost your job or haven't been able to find one in your field and you can't afford the rent any more. If you're lucky, your parents are both willing and able to let you move back in and regroup before you go back out into the world to live on your own.

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A lot of our thinking about money revolves around the gains: I'll invest X to get returns of Y per cent in the long term; I'll buy this couch because it will brighten up my apartment and make me happier. But when it comes to financial decisions, it's also important to consider what you'll be giving up.

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When you're going about your day-to-day, it's easy to put important questions about your career - what you really want to do, how you get there - on the backburner as you complete the tasks you need to get done now. And who wants to think about work in the few hours we have off?

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Everyone's nervous before a job interview, but there are plenty of ways you can amp yourself up and shake off the jitters. Of course you need to do your research on the company, and practise answers to the most common interview questions. The more you prepare, the more confident you'll feel. In addition, I like to listen to my running playlist before any type of situation in which I'm likely to be nervous but need to impress. You probably have your own tricks, too.

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As a new employee, there are a few pieces of advice you'll hear over and over again: Come in with a good attitude, offer to do extra work as often as possible, and never, ever, cry at work. But the fact is, you're human - you're going to cry. Rather than avoid it at all costs and reprimand yourself for not keeping your emotions in check, it's better to prepare for the time it happens.

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One of the struggles of covering personal finance is that the tips and tricks most experts recommend only make sense for a certain group of people: Those who have some disposable income and are likely upwardly mobile. Sure, you can write about handling setbacks and how big an emergency fund should be, but standard advice won't work for everyone.

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When you spend money impulsively, it isn't necessarily on luxuries. We buy some pretty boring stuff: Household cleaning products, for example. Research shows we like to buy practical, useful things, which makes spending impulsively even more dangerous.

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Everyone wants to learn tips and tricks for getting rich while exerting as little effort as possible. How can we save for a house, save for retirement, pay off debt, and live without sacrificing any of life's luxuries while working at a job we love?

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Spotify is planning to go public through a direct listing on the New York Stock Exchange in the next few weeks, and that's piqued the interest of investors hoping it's the next hot tech stock (a little more Netflix, a little less Snapchat). So, should you invest?