Tagged With cloud

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While the likes of Microsoft, Apple and other well known brands get most of the attention in the tech press, there's one company that has been there all the way since the birth of personal computing. Intel's processors and memory chips have been a foundational part of the world we live in for decades. But with many companies now entering the silicon business, Intel's market dominance is reducing.

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Software as a Service has been a huge boon to businesses. Suddenly, for a manageable monthly or annual fee, businesses have had access to high quality software that is maintained for them, updated with new features regularly and accessible without the hassle of installing special software on computers or other devices. But there is a downside. Customisation is limited and you're limited to functions the developer thinks are useful. But application platforms promise to change that.

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If the first age of computing was centred around the concept of the mainframe and massive, centralised computing power and the second was all about the PC and client-server, we are now in the third major era. Cloud computing has delivered massive computing power and storage, at a relatively low cost, that has allowed all sorts of new innovations. But moving from an existing on-prem infrastructure can be challenging. While Australian cloud adoption is quite high, many businesses are still to make the move. I recently spoke with Lee Atchison from NewRelic about how to successfully move to the cloud.

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When we think about the retail revolution, the discussion often turns to the likes of Amazon or the massive transformations being undertaken by established retailers like Myer, Woolworths and other familiar brands. But smaller, independent retailers are also important. With small business employing more Australians than any other sector, it's a vibrant and important part of the Aussie economy. Tim Cecil started Modern Classic after a long career in men's fashion. And he has embraced a number of new technologies in order to carve out a successful niche in men's fashion.

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Google is revamping its online storage offerings with a new-look, new-name product dubbed Google One. How much will it cost and what's going to happen to existing Google Drive customers? Here's what you need to know!

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Many companies have been adopting a 'cloud first' strategy but momentum on that front is slowing down as security risks and challenges take hold. That's the main finding from a report released by McAfee this week, with data loss and cyberattacks affecting deployment plans and the perception of the cloud as a safe option.

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Genome.one sequences and interprets genomes to provide diagnoses to people affected by genetic diseases or who have a predisposition to specific genetic conditions. What separates them from the likes of 23andMe and Ancestry.com's services is that Genome.one's goal is to provide information that is meaningful in a clinical sense. At the recent AWS Summit held in Sydney, I spoke with Associate Professor Marcel Dinger, from the Garvan Institute of Medical Research and CEO of Genome.one, about the evolution of this field and how cloud computing has been an enabler as the company navigates the risks of using cloud systems for such personal data.

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The 2018 Gold Coast Commonwealth Games might not be as big an event in global terms as the Olympics but they represent a watershed moment in Australian sports broadcasting. Clive Dickens is the COO of Seven West Media and leads the team that is bringing an unprecedented amount of broadcast and streamed sports content across the world. Seven West Media doesn't just have the local broadcast rights - they are also the host broadcaster which means they provide the images used by all the other international broadcasters covering the games. I spoke with Dickens at this week's AWS Summit about how they bring thousands of hours of sport to global audiences watching on everything from a 3.5 inch smartphone to massive screens in homes, pubs and clubs across the world.

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Over the last four years, Microsoft has been battling with the US court system over the ability for US law enforcement to compel them to hand over data that is stored on servers outside the US. While that case focussed on data relating to a drug trafficking operation, Microsoft saw it as a test of how data sovereignty is enforced in the courts. One of the Microsoft's arguments was that the courts were the wrong place fo such a matter to be resolved and that the US Congress should decide. That happened, and now we have the CLOUD Act.

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Dropbox has expanded the use of their Smart Sync feature, which keeps less-used files online without storing them on your local hard drive, to all Dropbox Professional users. Alongside this addition come a bunch of new admin and management features to assist with deploying Dropbox in businesses.

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Citrix has launched a locally-hosted instance of their Cloud Management Control Plane. This will give companies in Australia and New Zealand local access to a suite of Citrix cloud services. This means they won't need to be "beholden to a management plane that sits in the Americas or European Union" according to Les Williamson, the area vice president for Citrix in Australia and New Zealand. This will offer better performance though lower latency and assurance that entire cloud operations can be fully managed onshore he said.

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Cloud computing has completely revolutionised the way everyone, from an individual working at home to the largest enterprises in the world, works. The promise has been an always on, universally accessible platform we could all depend on to store data, run software and deliver services. But the cloud is fracturing, and the repercussions for everyone are significant.

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Chinese multinational Huawei has announced grand plans for its cloud computing arm. In short, it wants to form a global "cloud alliance" with telco partners around the world. This will allow for greater collaboration on the delivery of cloud solutions for international enterprises, similar to how airline alliances operate today.