Tagged With tabletop gaming

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Running a game of Dungeons & Dragons, or any tabletop role-playing game, involves telling your players what they see. Players rely on you to give a sense of tone and ambience, but also to point out anything interesting or relevant to their quest. But they also need you to leave them room to ask and explore. A good game master learns how to describe a scene in enough, but not too much, detail.

One way to learn that skill, says redditor non_player on r/RPG, is to turn audio descriptions on when watching movies and TV shows.

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If you ever tried to get into tabletop role-playing games - the kind where you sit around with character sheets, describing your actions and rolling dice - it was probably through Dungeons & Dragons. And if you're sick of medieval fantasy, or you don't care about fighting monsters, or you hate looking up stats on different charts, you might have walked away thinking "I guess I don't like RPGs." Which is a shame, because there are thousands of other RPGs out there.