Tagged With privacy

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It's likely that you've got details of your whole life stored on your phone — the people you know, the banks you've used, the videos you've wasted hours watching — and you don't necessarily want that info getting out into the wider world. If you're keen to lock down your handset against unwelcome visitors, you need to take a few steps.

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Twitter introduced an updated privacy policy this week that has users worried about how their private information is being tracked, stored and used. In the policy, the micro-blogging platform announced its plans to discontinue a privacy preference it previously honoured, store your cookies for a longer period of time, and change how Twitter shares your private data.

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Browser cookies are one of those technical bits of the internet that almost everyone has some awareness of. They're also probably one of the most misunderstood aspects of browsing. Today we're here to clear up the confusion.

Shared from Gizmodo

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You've spotted an app, site, or service you like the look of, it's completely free to use, and so you're ready to sign up — but how can you tell the service is above-board and legit? That you're not going to be subject to nefarious dark pattern tactics or see you or your teens sensitive data shared with advertisers. Before joining a service that seems to good to be true take the steps below. Common sense and a little digging can usually save you from the shadiest apps.

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The EU recently passed a new set of privacy regulations protecting the rights of individuals and giving them control over the PII held by companies operating in the EU. The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is a new regulation created by the European Parliament. It was adopted on 27 April 2016 and applies from 25 May 2018, with the next two years declared a transitional period for businesses to get ready.

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Late last week, the commissioner of the Australian Federal Police revealed that an officer has accessed the personal metadata of an Australian journalist as part of an investigation into that reporter’s sources for a story about the AFP. While Commissioner Colvin put it down to "human error” there is far more to this. What we have seen in this specific case is a complete breakdown of the protections we deserve as private citizens.

Shared from Gizmodo

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For years now, people have been letting Unroll.me read the contents of their email inboxes, to help them unsubscribe from email spam. The service was previously endorsed by us for its effectiveness in finding and cleaning out unwanted subscriptions (and Gizmodo wrote about its iOS app release last year).

But a New York Times profile of Uber this weekend revealed, in passing, that Unroll.me, which is owned by a company called Slice Intelligence, isn't just in the business of tidying up customers' inboxes. Slice makes money by scanning its users' email for receipts, then packaging that information into intel reports on consumer habits. Uber, for example, was paying Slice to find users' Lyft receipts, so it could see how much they were spending each month, "as a proxy for the health of Lyft's business."

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Users of the newsletter management app Unroll.me have been left outraged after discovering the service was "secretly" mining and selling their data to Uber - specifically, email receipts from rival company Lyft.

On the surface, this seems like a sneaky and underhanded betrayal of user trust. However, the app's Privacy Policy made it abundantly clear that this sort of thing was a possibility. It's another reminder that you need to actually read the terms and conditions if you care about privacy.

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Using a password manager is basically internet security 101 these days, but that doesn't make them any less intimidating. If you've never used a password manager, they're annoying, cumbersome to use, and baffling at a glance. 1Password is one of the easiest to use options around, but that doesn't mean you don't need some help setting it up.

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Australia’s data retention laws became compulsory yesterday, which means all telcos and internet service providers must now retain their customers' metadata for two years. This is supposed to assist law enforcement agencies in their war against homegrown terrorists and other criminals — but it arguably comes at the expense of normal Australians' privacy. Attempting to avoid these laws and send messages "off the gird" isn't easy, but it remains possible. Dr Philip Branch from the Swinburne University of Technology explains what you need to know.

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Last year, the Australian government released a partially-redacted list of Commonwealth agencies that have applied for access to metadata retained by Australia's telecommunications providers as part of the Telecommunications Interception and Access Act. (This information was only released in response to a Freedom of Information request.)

There are over five dozen government entities that want to look through your mobile, internet and home phone records, ostensibly to uncover criminal activity.