Tagged With photography

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It can feel nearly impossible to you access a sense of wonder in today's all-the-information-any-time-you-want-it environment, but the answer, I find, is often in the natural world. Whether it's feeling the strange cool breeze that arises during the totality of an eclipse, watching a thousand-strong starling murmuration swirl in the sky, or tasting fresh mango plucked from the tree in front of you, our sensory experience of Earth's pleasures -- even if we know exactly how and why they happen -- can reacquaint us with wonder.

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Last week, my favourite web-based photo editor, PicMonkey, started charging users. As it turns out, PicMonkey has also been a favourite with a good number of my Lifehacker coworkers. It's easy, lightweight and makes small edits like resizing photos or creating collages (stuff we do here pretty regularly) super simple. I've been using it almost every day, multiple times a day, for years.

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Last month I went to Outside Lands, a three-day music festival in San Francisco where musical artists from pretty much every genre out there performed on a bunch of different stages around Golden Gate Park. Regardless of what type of music was being played, each stage had one thing in common: Someone (or a lot of people) were standing close to the stage with their phones hoisted to take pictures and shoot video, obstructing the view of everyone behind them. As a shorter person, I experienced the vast majority of the shows during the weekend by watching them through someone's phone screen. Besides being obnoxious, turns out there also isn't much of a point to filming everything.

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Over the course of a year, I take thousands of pictures that I either share on Facebook or Instagram or leave to die on my smartphone's camera roll. While the idea is that I'll go back and look at them at some point, truth be told that rarely happens. The closest I get is when something comes up in conversation, I remember I took a picture years ago, and I search through Google Photos or my Facebook photo gallery to see if I can find it, which I do roughly 50 per cent of the time. Now, Kodak has a new app and Facebook bot designed specifically to help you unearth those awesome memories that you captured by then forgot about.

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For decades, photo and video equipment was designed and tested with only white subjects in mind. Lighting darker skin tones takes a different approach than lighting pale ones. Ava Berkofsky, director of photography on HBO's Insecure, tells Mic how her team beautifully lights the show's black actors, and Mic reporter Xavier Harding demonstrates some of the techniques below.

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There's nothing wrong with being a little nervous if you're out practising your street photography. Taking pictures of unaware people in candid situations, or approaching someone for a more deliberate photo isn't easy, but if you're trying to improve, acting the part of wallflower will only hinder your progress. It's a skill you'll need to develop, but you can improve your street photography effectiveness by following a few simple rules (and cracking open a cold one).

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I'm obsessed with 360 pictures. I'm that obnoxious person that likes to show my friends a huge slideshow of pictures of my latest trip. Pictures can do an OK job of showing off a particular place, but 360-degree photos take on the task so much better. With a 360 photo, you can really show someone what it's like to stand in the middle of a massive garden in Paris, or on the rooftop balcony of a hotel in Singapore.