Tagged With minecraft

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It's hard to say exactly why children with autism are some of the greatest devotees of Minecraft, the computer game in which you build endless worlds out of LEGO-like blocks. Stuart Duncan, a father of two, believes it's because it's a perfect union of two opposites. On one hand, Minecraft offers structure - everything from the water to the doors to the falling lava behaves with a certain predictability that they need. On the other hand, it gives the player infinite freedom. There's no story, no levels, no bosses presenting participants with quests to complete. Behind the shield of their computer screen, players can do whatever they want to do in a sensory-friendly space - recreate the Taj Mahal, light up a house with torches, or hide in a cave.

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As the parent of a young adult with Type 1 diabetes, I understand some of the challenges folks face when diagnosed with their condition. And, for some kids, it can be hard to teach them about what's happening in their bodies as they navigate the world of insulin, hypo- and hyper- glycaemia, monitoring your blood sugar and managing your diet. Magikcraft is leveraging Minecraft to help engage children diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes in making their way through this new world.

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When your kid shows interest in a popular phenomenon, usually there's not much to understand -- you just help them turn on the videos, and put the toys on their birthday wish list. But it's a little trickier when your kid comes home and insists that they need to play Minecraft. You have some learning to do.