Tagged With media center

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We've talked about building a Mac mini media center and other ways to pimp your mini in the past, but blogger Jon Hicks revisits the Mac mini media centre with a focus on using it with Leopard and EyeTV (a Mac DVR solution). While Apple TV is doing its best to justify a place in your living room, it still doesn't time-shift television, and many Mac enthusiasts still find that the Mac mini still outdoes Apple's latest media centre offering. On the other hand, if you're still rolling Panther on your Mac, you could just install Apple TV on it and call it a day.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

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Mac OS X Tiger only: ATV4mac runs Apple TV take 2 as a Mac application, bringing all the cool multimedia features of the Apple TV to your Mac. ATV4mac is a fairly young project, hence the unfortunate Tiger-only support at the moment, but it's already sporting most of the features available to Apple TV along with a few of its own. ATV4mac is freeware, Mac OS X Tiger only. I wasn't able to try it because of the Tiger limitation, but if you give it a go, share your thoughts in the comments. If you're dying to get more advanced media centre support than Front Row has to offer but you've already upgraded to Leopard, check out previously mentioned XBMC for Mac.

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More devices in your living room have Ethernet ports than ever before, but you can't plug them into the network if your router's in the other room. When your Wi-Fi access point is in the home office but your TiVo, Xbox, and media centre are screaming for network love under your TV in the living room, you want a wireless bridge (also known as an Ethernet converter). A wireless bridge catches your home network's Wi-Fi signal and provides ports where you can plug in wired devices near it. Let's take a look at how to wire up your living room using a wireless bridge.

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The Knoppix Live Linux CD can do more than just rescue files from an unbootable hard drive—the full operating system on an optical disk has a host of software packages including multimedia apps. The Hackszine blog points out a free excerpt from O'Reilly's new book, Knoppix Hacks, which details how to listen to and edit audio, burn CDs and DVDs, and watch video and TV with Knoppix. After the jump, preview the sample hack PDF.

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These days, every gaming system in your living room better be able to do more than just play video games if it's going to earn its place next to your TV. The Xbox 360 makes for an excellent Media Center extender, and the original Xbox is the king of homebrew video-game-cum-media-boxes, but when it comes to expanding your home theatre beyond gaming, the Wii has always been a bit light on functionality. The best thing it's got going for it is the excellent Opera web browser, but web browsing with the Wii remote is still a bit clunky. Luckily, using that very same browser, you can turn your Wii into a full-fledged media centre with the freeware Windows application Orb. Here's how.

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Mac OS X only: Whether or not you've already transformed your old Xbox into a media center with Xbox Media Center (XBMC), chances are you've seen what a killer media center application XBMC is. If you've ever wished you could bring the same saucy media center interface to your Mac, your wishes are finally being answered with XBMC for Mac. That's right, the Unix app for the original Xbox has been ported to Macs, and though it's only the 0.1 version, it already performs amazingly. If you're already a Front Row/Apple TV lover, you're probably wondering what the point of XBMC on your Mac is. Well, the main reasons you may way to run XBMC (lifted from the 9 to 5 Mac interview) are:

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You've turned your Windows PC into a media center powerhouse on the cheap, and everything's great while you're at home. You can watch live and recorded TV, schedule new recordings, or peruse your entire media library from the comfort of your couch. What if I told you that you could do the same thing from any computer, at home or away, and you didn't have to shell out for new equipment to do it? Forgot to schedule a game you don't want to miss? Want to catch up on last week's episode on your laptop or even your cell phone? With the free Media Center add-on WebGuide, you can extend your Windows Media Center to any browser (including mobile browsers), so no matter where you are, you can take the convenience of Media Center with you.

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While computer manufacturers are now coming out with "media servers" to sell to consumers, Popular Mechanics claims that it's not necessary to buy a brand new machine. Instead, use cheap (or salvaged) parts to build your own box, as media server hardware doesn't have to be top-notch. The biggest hurdle is choosing what operating system to use. For free and fully functional, the article suggest Ubuntu. The catch: it's not that easy to configure. The other option would be to go with the expensive, albeit easy OS (Windows Media Server).