Tagged With government

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Breaking into devices that are protected with strong encryption has been a vexed issue for the government. While, on one hand it's easy to see the rationale for law enforcement wanting to access devices during criminal investigations, this needs to be balanced by the desire, or perhaps even right, for individuals to expect that their private communications and information remain private. But the government is pushing on with their legislative agenda, seeking to compel tech companies to help them access encrypted messages.

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Budget night is fast approaching - which means we're about to find out who'll get squeezed for more taxes. Personal incomes tax cuts are on the agenda, but they aren't expected to amount to much for individual Aussies. As ever, some people will feel the pinch more than others. Here's how the current projection compares to the tax rates of previous governments.

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Microsoft has opened two new Azure regions, both based in Canberra, in partnership with Canberra Data Centres. The new Azure Australia Central Regions will cater specifically to the needs of government and national critical infrastructure for Australia and New Zealand with a focus on high performance, resilience and availability. The new regions will not be be for broad-scale use, with multiple connectivity options available.

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The Minister for Home Affairs, Petter Dutton, has flagged that he plans to introduce legislation to the parliament that will compel companies that provide end-to-end encryption on products and services to decrypt communications and data when requested. But there seems to be a fundamental difference in understanding in how encryption works and how they think it works.

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The Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) is in the process of redesigning the country's banknotes with an emphasis on new security features. Following in the footsteps of the $5 and $10 notes, we now have a new $50 version - and we're beginning to come around to the updates.

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The Federal government is going to spin revelations of the leaked Cabinet papers in lots of ways. But the entire matter comes down to a simple fact. Information security might be backed by technology in many cases. But all the best tech in the world isn't worth a pinch of salt if humans cock things up.

This leak, which will cause great embarrassment in government and opposition ranks, is the fault of people who simply didn't do their jobs.

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You're probably aware that developed nations such as Israel, Russia
and the United States have missile defence systems. But do you know how these systems work? Or how effective they are? They're not the impenetrable shield you think they are.

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The major Australian banks are following familiar public relations tactics in requesting a parliamentary commission of inquiry into banking and financial services. When the public mood is against an industry, it will try to win the public over, while getting the politicians to ignore the public mood. If that fails, the industry gradually concedes ground until attention goes elsewhere.

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After 900 failed attempts to repeal the Affordable Care Act (that number may be a little off, it's been a long year), US President Trump took two actions yesterday that could destroy insurance markets. US citizens will still be able to buy an "Obamacare" plan for next year and their current insurance will still work. But this portends some very bad news.

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As northeast Asia teeters on the brink of a conflict that could escalate beyond anyone’s control, it is more important than ever to be well-informed about North Korea, and move beyond the common caricatures of the country and its leader, Kim Jong-un. This is difficult when many misconceptions about North Korea perpetuate in the public consciousness.