Tagged With google chrome

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It feels like every website today wants to send you notifications, regardless of how big or small they are. Visit a page in Chrome, for instance and you'll often see a dialog in the top-left asking you to allow notifications. If you're sick of seeing these, it is possible to rid yourself of them forever... or selectively, depending on your mood.

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Chrome: I can't recall the last time I didn't install an extension from the Google's Chrome Web Store. However, developers - up until now - have been allowed to offer their extensions as inline downloads. In other words, they could drop a download button on a website, you'd click on it and see a typical installation confirmation dialogue (as if you were installing the extension from the Chrome Web Store itself), and before you knew it, you were +1 to extensions.

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Since its debut, Chrome has grown in popularity, though its once-stellar reputation has taken a bit of a hit as of late. Examples of Chrome-only sites are more and more common, reminiscent of the days when Microsoft's Internet Explorer dominated the web browser market. It's been shown to be a massive memory hog as well, slowing down machines as users create more and more tabs.

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The web's more media-heavy that it's ever been, with a great many sites serving images like Sanitarium Up & Gos out of the back of a Black Thunder. This isn't a problem until the image loading clogs up rendering of the rest of the page, causing your browsing experience to suffer. The good news is there's a Chrome flag you can enable to alleviate this.

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Google has a long history of introducing, then forgetting about, and finally officially killing off its products. Most recently, that included Google Spaces, a service that most of us never knew existed to begin with. Let's take a tour of some of our favourite services Google's killed off over the years.

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We only get so much time in this life, and yours is running out, friend. That might seem scary, but it doesn't have to be - it can be motivating. Sometimes you just need a reminder that you need to make it count. This tool sets your Google Chrome homepage and any new blank tabs you open to a clock slowly ticking toward your demise.

Shared from Kotaku

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Last year, I spent a chunk of time playing around with different browsers. Microsoft Edge, much to much dismay, got a run for a couple of weeks. I mucked around with the early days of the Firefox Quantum beta. And then, just like everyone else, I went back to Chrome.

But even though I returned to the home of Google, I've still been angling for something different. And over the last few weeks, I found myself using Firefox more and more, until the browser finally became my default option across all platforms.

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A few years ago I moved across the country, a time zone away from my family and most of my friends. Moving across the country comes with a number of challenges, but the biggest of those ended up being the whole friends thing. Going from a decently large network of friends to knowing that one guy I hung out with at a party a few years ago caused some serious FOMO when my friends back home were going out or having a movie night.

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I'm not a big fan of browsing the web on my phone, mainly due to my browser's terrible control scheme. Everything is too spaced out. The keyboard's at the bottom of the vertically oriented display, essential controls are tucked into hard to reach corners, and I don't want to risk dropping my phone by performing a little one-handed gymnastics for a new tab.

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If you've been using Google Chrome to store all of your logins and passwords, that's great - a lot better than scribbling your passwords on sticky notes and attaching them to your desktop monitor or laptop. Third-party password managers are even better (cross-platform, in many cases), and a new Chrome setting now makes it easy to move all of of your browser-saved passwords to a new app.

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Frozen webpages, a precursor to the ever-frustrating dead tab, can be intensely frustrating -- all the more so when you can't accurately identify what's causing the slowdown or random dead tab. If you want to learn more about what windows or processes are demanding too much of your memory and processing power, technology site gHacks suggests you look under the hood of Google Chrome using its built-in task manager.

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You hate it as much as I do: that little box that appears whenever you visit a news site or blog, asking for permission to bug you with notification boxes for stuff you don't care about. Instead of throwing up your hands in defeat and learning to live with the annoyance, you can stop sites from bothering you altogether. Here's how.