Tagged With fitbit

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We're a sucker for a good deal here at Lifehacker, and when you're elbow deep in deals on a daily basis you notice a lot of similar deals popping up on the regular. We've distilled these patterns to discover the products that are easiest to find a good deal on - and that you should therefore never settle for buying at full price.

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More exercise is better than less, but beyond that, there’s nothing special about taking 10,000 steps each day.

That goal may have started with a popular Japanese pedometer of the 1960s named manpo-kei, the “10,000-step meter.” It was just a catchy name, but it stuck because it’s a good goal for at least some of us. 10,000 steps is roughly five miles — challenging but not impossible to fit into a busy day.

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The Australian Competition and Comnsumer Commission (ACCC) has put the smack down on Fitbit after the company made representations to buyers about their rights that were contrary to Australian consumer law. From November 2016 to March 2017, Fitbit told customers that its warranty was only available for one year and that faulty products would be only replaced for the remainder of the calendar year or 30 days, whichever was longer.

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Fitbit has just launched what they say is one of their most requested features: Period tracking. The app and smartwatch can now show you where in your cycle you are, the better to correlate cycle data with your nutrition and sleep.

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However you get your workouts in, you might eventually reach a point where you want to keep track of them so you know how many calories you burn, what distances you travel, and what heart rate you hit while exercising. All of which is very easy to keep tabs on if you own an Apple Watch.

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In his two and a half years at Fitbit, Jonah Becker has helped the company outrun (pun!) industry giant Apple. As VP of Design, he oversees UX and industrial design teams for Fitbit's line of health-tracking wearables. Before that, Becker spent 15 years running design studio One & Co., which HTC bought in 2013. We asked him how he works.

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You've probably heard the saying that if you're getting the product for free, then you probably are the product. The most recent earnings report from Fitbit might be the ultimate proof. While its fitness wearables cost a pretty penny, they're almost useless without the backend services that collate and give meaning to your data. Now, on the back of a US$113M loss on almost US$400M of revenue, the company is looking for ways to monetise all those steps and activities.

Shared from Gizmodo

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After months of leaks and hints, Fibit has finally revealed its newest wrist wearable: The $US300 ($379) Fitbit Ionic. Fitbit claims up to four days of battery life, a refined OS that pairs nicely with devices running iOS, Android, and Windows, and a brand new sensor for tracking your heart rate. This smartwatch, which visually calls to mind the lovechild of an Apple Watch and a Fitbit Surge, is a natural progression for the huge wearable company. Just last year, it snapped up notable smartwatch makers Pebble and Vector for a reported $US38 ($48) million. And between the almost-perfect Surge and the incredibly unattractive Blaze, Fitbit has been interested in the smartwatch sector of the wearable market for a while. This is the culmination of that interest. It's profoundly ugly -- like every Fitbit that's come before, but it could be technologically cool enough that you might not care.

Shared from Gizmodo

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You've got data pouring in from your connected fitness tracker, your smartphone, your smartwatch, the smart scales in your bathroom and the dieting app you use to log your meals -- so how do you get all of this information in one place? It isn't easy, but here are a few pointers to help.

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One of the perils of smart devices is that many rely on their respective company's online servers to function, and sometimes those companies shut down. Which leaves you with an expensive paperweight. Luckily Pebble has had the foresight to update their smartwatches after being acquired by Fitbit last year.

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With the original Microsoft Band never seeing release in Australia, the Band 2 is going to be our first glimpse of Microsoft's wearable technology. While it can access email, messages and call alerts, the Band is far more fitness tracker than smartwatch, unlike Apple or Samsung's wearable offerings. So is there any advantage to getting the Microsoft Band 2 over one of the forerunners of the industry like the Fitbit or one of Garmin's fitness trackers?

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Working in an office can be bad for your health. You are chained to your chair and desk most of the day and if you don't plan properly you end up getting takeaway food for lunch. Perhaps its time your company thought about introducing a corporate wellness program, which is something activity tracker technology vendor, Fitbit, highly recommends.