Tagged With driving safety

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Last year I learned to drive again after a 10-year break. I was surprised how dramatically cars had evolved in that period; I learned to be way lighter on the gas and brake, and whenever I used a rear-view camera to park, I felt like I was cheating.

I didn’t learn this: it’s no longer ideal to hold your steering wheel at '10 and 2.' According to experts, in a crash you could seriously injure your hands by driving in this position.

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You step into a street you thought was empty - then you hear it. A car is careening toward you, tyres squealing as the driver slams on the breaks. You have less than a second to react and save your life. Here's what you do.

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Getting pulled over by Aussie cops is already nerve-wracking, but when it happens somewhere far from home it can be even scarier. Laws are different, customs vary, and you may have to pay a fine on the spot. Here's what you need to know before you get behind the wheel outside of your home country.

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I've always wanted to drive a Tesla. Silent electric motors, instant torque and autonomous driving capabilities? Sign me up. As luck would have it, during my Christmas vacation spent at my partner's parent's home, I was able to drive their Tesla Model S for a week. The experience was, in a word, magical -- primarily because of the differences between a Tesla and a traditional automobile.

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In the 1950s, holidaying while black in America was dangerous. The commonplace discrimination occurring during the Jim Crow era meant black travellers struggled to find a hotel room in which to stay, or a restaurant where they could grab a meal. Too often they were met with met with hostility, refused service or worse. So when a brother like me wanted to get out of town, that meant grabbing a Green Book -- a guidebook for black travellers offering tips on how to tour the country safely, as well as a directory of safe holiday destinations.

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This week on The Upgrade, we spoke with Steve Casner, author of the book Careful: A User's Guide to Our Injury-Prone Minds. Steve is a research psychologist with NASA who studies how and why we get hurt in our everyday activities: Whether we're chopping vegetables, climbing ladders, or just walking down the street. We found out how we can stay safe without hiding in bed all day -- and why we should embrace our bad attitudes.