Tagged With diet

1

When it comes to healthy snacking, most people concentrate on foods that are low in fat and sugar. However, effective satiation is also important - otherwise you'll end up snacking way more than you should.

Researchers from the University of Sydney set out to determine which foods are best at filling you up and keeping you full. The result is the Satiety Index Of Common Foods. It's essential reading for anyone on a diet.

0

Some foods are too delicious to completely let go of when you're trying to reduce your calorie intake. For me, those things are a topping or dip of some kind that usually require an additional calorie-heavy food to deliver the tasty goodness to my mouth. If you're dieting, it's smart to replace the delivery method with something healthier — or just do what I do and forego it entirely.

27

Finding clear, definitive facts about healthy exercise can be difficult. The exercise industry is a multi-billion dollar business, built partially on selling gadgets and supplements to people desperate to lose weight or look attractive. Meanwhile, good workout plans and simple truths lurk in the background waiting for their time to shine. All of this results in lots of misinformation about exercise. We're taking some of those commonly-held exercise myths to task, and we have science to back us up. Let's get started.

1

Travelling really takes it out of you - except when it comes to poop. That can stay with you for days, making your holiday a lot less enjoyable. Here's what causes that constipation frustration, and what you can do to keep that from happening.

1

Every year, for many, many years, I would promise myself I'd lose weight. Sometimes I would make a little headway, but mostly I didn't. Then in 2017, it happened. Like most huge changes, it was actually lots of little choices adding up to something big. Here's how I did it.

3

Omega-3s were supposed to protect us all from heart disease and other health problems, but it's taken some time for the evidence to catch up with the hype around these supplements. Based on a large and important study published earlier this year in JAMA Cardiology, that evidence is here: fish oil or omega-3 supplements won't help people with heart disease.

0

When your daily commute is 20 steps between your bedroom and home office, the biggest threats to your weight and health are lack of movement and the temptations of a fully-stocked kitchen and fridge. Here are tips to nip those Pac-Man-like habits in the bud when you don't even need to leave the house.

3

We all have that one friend whose eating habits and body shape simply don’t add up. While enjoying the unhealthiest of meals and a sedentary lifestyle, somehow they effortlessly retain a slender figure.

At first glance we may assume these slim people are healthy, but it’s not always the case. Being healthy has nothing to do with your BMI and everything to do with what you put in your mouth.

14

If you've read into health and fitness at all, you've probably seen variations of "breakfast is the most important meal of the day", "eat breakfast to kickstart your metabolism" or perhaps "skip breakfast and die". As it turns out, all of that is probably wrong.

0

We've been through a lot this year, from politics wearing on our mental health to wellness purveyors trying to sell us stuff we don't need. Here are some of our best health how-tos, explainers, and mythbusters of 2017.

0

Image: Yuriy Maksymiv/Shutterstock

“Of all the parasites that affect humanity I do not know of, nor can I imagine, any more distressing than that of Obesity.”

So started William Banting‘s “Letter on Corpulence,” likely the first diet book ever published. Banting, an overweight undertaker, published the book in 1864 to espouse his success after replacing an excessive intake of bread, sugar and potatoes with mostly meat, fish and vegetables.

2

A child's diet should be high in fruit and vegetables, high in complex carbohydrates such as brown bread, brown pasta and brown rice and relatively low in fat and sugary foods. It should also be low in salt. But as many of us know, getting children to eat what is good for them can be easier said than done. So how do you get your child to eat a healthy diet?

0

Maybe failed dieters need therapy for overeating, not food restriction, argues Claire Zulkey in the Atlantic. She describes the cycle that many dieters fall into: A controlled eating plan -- this many grams of cheese, a deck-of-cards portion of meat, probably no Twisties -- and then the frenzy of overeating that ensues when the dieter gives in to temptation: A whole pizza, three breakfasts at McDonald's, many bags of Twisties. Frustrated and ashamed, they start an even more restrictive diet (often preceded by a final last-hurrah binge) and begin the cycle all over again.