Tagged With apple

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iOS 11 is lying to you. Sure, the operating system is full of new features, fixes, and a generally more pleasant aesthetic, but one change is rubbing me (and other battery-conscious users) the wrong way. The revamped Control Center's actions when dealing with the disabling of wireless connectivity are misleading, telling users their Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connections are off when that isn't the case.

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iOS: Having an elaborate, secure password on your Wi-Fi network can be a great thing. A great thing until that weekend you have guests visiting from out of town and they have to try your 20-character Wi-Fi password a dozen different times because a zero looks like an O or they couldn't tell from your chicken scratch which letters are capitalised and which aren't.

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I'm about to set up a new home office so, naturally, I visited my local IKEA for inspiration and ideas. And, I'm also keen to get the new iPhone X when it's available later this year (yeah, I know it's expensive and all that but I'm entrenched in the iOS ecosystem and it's so shiny and new). And that means I can take advantage of IKEA's range of office gear that integrates Qi wireless charging.

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While there is a lot of hype around the launch of Apple’s new all-glass iPhone X, the attention of consumer lawyers is probably focused in a different direction. In April, the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) alleged that Apple had contravened consumer law by wrongly representing to customers they were not entitled to have a phone defect remedied if their device had previously been fixed by an “unauthorised” repairer.

The action was brought after reports that some consumers who had had their screen repaired by a third party suffered an “error 53”, which disabled their iPhone or iPad, after downloading an iOS update. Given that the new iPhone launched on Tuesday in the US, it’s timely to think about the rights available to Apple fans under Australian law if they suffer that most common of breakages – the shattered screen.

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If the rumour mill is correct, we could be looking at a $1500 price tag on Apple's new iPhone when it hits stores in a few weeks. And it won't be alone; Samsung's new Note 8 also launches with a $1,499 RRP towards the end of the month.

But you don’t have to spend $1500 on a new phone, of course. There are loads of great options for half the price or less. We've also included a selection of mobile plans for each option!

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Aside from the embarrassing gaffe that put Apple's Face ID in the spotlight when it failed to recognise Craig Federighi's smiling visage during the Apple dog-and-pony show earlier this week, Face ID is now facing questions from the US senate. But the implications are broader and the questions Tim Cook is being asked are interesting.

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The old subject of whether Aussies are paying too much for their tech rears its head whenever a new, expensive product hits the market. And I've been seeing a few people already complaining that Apple is charging their so called "Australia tax" here, bumping the price up on the new iPhones that were announced yesterday. So, are we being fleeced by Apple?

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It's been a decade since Apple changed mobile phones forever and today, they announced their latest model - the iPhone X. We've covered all the finer details here, and with Samsung's Note 8 releasing in a couple of weeks, you might be wondering how the two stack up to one another. In a battle of the mobile heavyweights, who wins?

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They're here! Apple's new iPhone range have finally rumbled onto the world stage with a host of improvements under their collective hoods. Some of the changes are significant, others are incremental. If you're planning to upgrade to the iPhone 8 or iPhone 8 Plus, here's everything you need to know, including Australian pricing, release date and specifications.