Servers

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Network storage is really useful. From backups to sharing data, a NAS is an easy way to make storage accessible to everyone on your network. Over on Circuit Breaker, there are instructions on how to make a one-bay NAS from a NanoPi NEO - a version of the Raspberry Pi Zero.

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Businesses, large and small, have access to more data than ever before. Cloud services, ranging from Dropbox to AWS offer as much storage as you can use and afford. But that doesn’t mean local storage isn’t still a good option. Synology’s DS916+ NAS aims to bridge the gap between the cloud and local storage by offering the best of both worlds - local storage that delivers lots of cloud-like services.

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Despite the popularity of SSDs for desktop and notebook devices, there’s still a strong market for traditional spinning hard drives. While we always need the fastest storage possible, there’s a balancing act between performance, storage volume and price. Which explains why Seagate has released a 12TB 3.5-inch drive.

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I'm a sucker for a good factory tour. I recently had the opportunity to visit two of Seagate's facilities in Singapore. Woodlands is a plant where Seagate manufactures hard drives while Shugart, named for the company's founder, was focused on testing drives. I thought I knew a bit about storage but those tours were an eye-opener. Here's what I learned.

Shared from Gizmodo

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A little after 5AM this morning, countless websites and web services ground to a halt following a reported widespread outage of Amazon Web Services (AWS). Everything from Slack to Quora to Gizmodo saw major disruptions. Before Down Detector itself went down, the site showed outages on the tier 1 network Level 3 in most major population centres in the United States.

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Many Australian Tax Office (ATO) IT systems have been unavailable for days after a major fault, apparently caused by a problem with a large-scale storage server. The ATO’s online systems, including its public website and portals for taxation agents, were down for several days. At the time of writing, the ATO reports that most services are now operational but may experience slowdowns. It's been a few days since the outage happened. Here's what we know so far.

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The Australian Tax Office (ATO) website went down for two days due to a storage hardware failure. The hardware was provided by HP Enterprise (HPE) and the fault affected backup systems as well. The ATO is now trying to recover one petabyte of data.

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RAM drives aren't as popular as they used to be, with the speedy performance of solid-state drives good enough for most. But they still have their uses and with the average PC sporting 8GB of system RAM, sparing a couple of gigabytes is not a problem. The thing is, video cards are starting to pack on memory as well. So, is it possible to use GPU RAM as a virtual drive? Certainly.

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If you know a thing or two about hard drives, you're likely aware of SMART, or Self-Monitoring Analysis and Reporting Technology. All modern drives come equipped with this functionality, but taking the statistics it provides and predicting an actual drive failure? Fortunately, data backup firm Backblaze has real-world data to play with and as such, a solid understanding of how SMART factors into drive reliability.

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The cost of buying bandwidth from network providers in Australia and New Zealand are extremely high. How high? Web performance company CloudFlare measured it and found that it is up to 21.3 times higher compared to Europe. The company blamed large telcos like Telstra and Optus for charging too much. Here's what you need to know.

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In the wake of the Census debacle that happened this week, there's been a lot of finger-pointing as to who was to blame. Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull has put the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) and IBM, the company hosting and managing the Census website, on notice, expressing his disappointment over Tuesday's website meltdown. Well, he's going to be even more disappointed today as the Census website went down again last night. It's looking more likely that IBM will be shouldering the majority of the blame for the Census disaster. Read on to find out more.

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Around 48 hours after the Census website was pulled after alleged repeated DDoS attacks, and hundreds of thousands of Aussies actually trying to complete the Census, the Australian Bureau of Statistics' Census website came back to life this afternoon. But, in a move that isn't entirely surprising, the site continues to have issues. It's up, it's down, it's up again...