How To Make Fresh-Baked Bread In Five Minutes

Can you spare five minutes each day? That's all it takes to have fresh-baked bread with this recipe and method.

Now, thanks to Jeff Hertzberg and Zoë François, you can have fresh-baked bread with only five minutes of actual effort each time:

A one or two-week supply of dough is made in advance and refrigerated. Mixing it takes less than 15 minutes. Every day, cut off a hunk of dough and quickly shape it without kneading. Allow it to rest briefly on the counter and then toss it in the oven. We don't count the rest time or baking time (usually about 30 minutes to an hour each) in our calculation, because you can do something else while that's happening.

If you bake after dinner, the bread will still be fresh the next day (higher moisture breads stay fresh longer), but the method is so convenient that you'll probably find you can cut off some dough and bake a loaf every morning before your day starts. If you want to have one thing you do every day that is simply perfect, this is it!

Hertzberg and François even make remembering the recipe simple by explaining the "6-3-3-13" rule:

To store enough for eight loaves, remember 6-3-3-13. It's 6 cups water, 3 tablespoons salt, 3 tablespoons yeast, and then add 13 cups of flour. It'll amaze your friends when you do this in their homes without a recipe!

Using this rule, you can easily cut the recipe into half or double it in your head if needed, just maintain the same ratios. Follow the link below for the details on the recipe and several variations or tell us about your favourite bread recipe in the comments.

[Via Mother Earth News]


Comments

    We don't count the rest time or baking time (usually about 30 minutes to an hour each) in our calculation, because you can do something else while that's happening.

    Umm that's not how time works. If you make it in 5 minutes, that's start to finish in 5 minutes, not 5 minutes of work, plus another half an a hour of work, plus another hour of baking time.

      Haha was thinking the same. As an electrician by that theory it should only take me 30 seconds per powerpoint in a house! Wow! Only slight catch is you just have to remember to run the wiring first, cut the hole in the plaster, twist the wires together and have the switchboard fitted off. Then just come back later with a screwdriver and voila!

    I SUPPOSE you could say it is 5 minutes. After the 15 minutes prep. Which doesn't say if the mixing needs to rest for those magical minutes that don't exist.
    So by the article, I just chuck all the ingredients in a bowl, stir for 15 minutes, then slap it in the fridge? Does the yeast work in the fridge?

    Rest time plus bake time equals a minimum of an hour, so I can't make bread in the morning, that is longer than up-to-out-the-door.

    So yeah, great idea, I may even try it, totally misleading article.

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