Tagged With internet explorer 7

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Windows only: If you never want to have to tweak Internet Explorer's settings again—and there are many, many settings—Backrex Internet Explorer Backup has you covered. The small, step-by-step backup program grabs everything from Internet Explorer 6 or 7, including cookies, add-ons, auto-complete entries, connection settings, and, of course, your favourites .You back it all up to a zip file that's compressed and, if you'd like, password-protected, and can restore settings in the same click-by-click fashion. The app doesn't support the Internet Explorer 8 betas from what I can tell, but that may be on the way. BackRex Internet Explorer is a free download for Windows systems only. BackRex Internet Explorer Backup

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Read the hype on every new web browser released or due out this year, and you'll see claims that every one of them is "faster" than all the others. You could compare super-specific tests and decipher all the code-brain terminology, and you'd still be left wondering which browser starts quicker, uses less memory, and slides through dynamic interfaces like Gmail the fastest. Since our squadron of independent analysts had the week off, we ran the latest editions of Firefox, Internet Explorer, Opera 9.5, and Safari for Windows through some unscientific but highly geeky tests ourselves on a plain old Windows computer. Take a look at the full (and somewhat unexpected) results after the jump.

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Windows/Internet Explorer only: Yahoo has released a beta version of their browser plug-in for social bookmarking tool del.icio.us for Internet Explorer. It'll look pretty familiar to anyone who's used their del.icio.us Bookmarks Firefox add-on (original post), with toolbar buttons for quick bookmarking and tag browsing, and complete integration and syncing with local bookmarks. It's still faster and more convenient than heading to del.icio.us or utilising tag-required bookmarklets, however. The del.icio.us add-on runs on Internet Explorer 6, 7, and even the IE8 beta on Windows XP and Vista.

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You already know that Firefox is a superior web browser, but you still have to use Internet Explorer on a daily basis. Whether a stubborn IE-only web site or full-on IT lockdown keeps you from using Firefox, things aren't as bleak as they seem: You can cram many of Firefox's best features into the proprietary beast that is Internet Explorer. After the jump, find out how to add bookmark syncing, integrated spell-checking, session management, keyword bookmarks, ad blocking, inline search, undo-closed-tab functionality, and oh-so-much more to IE.

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The How-To Geek blog posts a truly helpful guide to figuring out what's causing Internet Explorer 7 to slow down, particularly on Windows Vista systems. Starting with running IE7 in safe mode, the guide is a boon for anyone not particularly tweak-savvy as it moves through disabling add-ons, confusing options boxes, and all the way to disabling auto-tuning, plus the ultimate fix—unplugging and re-plugging your router, of course. Regardless of skill level, it's a good forward for anyone you know who can't/won't install Firefox and is tired of browsing the Internet at slug-like speeds. (Original auto-tuning post) Troubleshooting Internet Explorer on Vista Locking Up or Running Slowly

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Windows only: Add Firefox-style address bar shortcuts with IE Alias, a free add-on for Internet Explorer 7. While address bar alias shortcuts—as in typing "lh" to get to Lifehacker.com—have been available in packages such as IE7Pro (original post), IE Alias' tool adds the nifty ability to open multiple URLs with the same shortcut, giving Internet Explorer the same kind of "Open All in Tabs" convenience of, well, Firefox. IE Alias is a free download for Windows systems and Internet Explorer 7 only.

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Windows/IE7 only: Nothing's better than heading to a web page to find some information and being greeted with a slow-loading, over-the-top Flash intro, right? For distracting, crash-causing, or otherwise troublesome animated pages, Toggle Flash, a free Internet Explorer 7 add-on, soothes the pain pretty quickly. Once you've installed the toolbar button, a single click turns off Flash functionality in the background; click again, hit refresh, and the videos, animations, and other Flash elements return. It's small, it uses no background memory, and it just works. Toggle Flash is a free download for Windows systems and Internet Explorer 7 only; hit either link below for help getting the button to show up on your toolbar. Toggle Flash

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Internet Explorer 7 might have some chops when it comes to handling and organizing RSS feeds, but dedicated Google Reader fans don't get much love from the browser—there's no option in the interface for adding a feed anywhere but inside IE7's "Live Bookmarks," leaving the copy-and-paste job to the user. Alex at the Google Operating System blog points out two makeshift solutions: Install Google Toolbar 5, or add a nifty "Subscribe" bookmarklet to your Links toolbar, provided on Google Reader's Settings->Goodies page. Both seem far more convenient than digging to find the address of a site's feed and pasting it into Google Reader's "Add Subscription" dialog. Add Feeds to Google Reader in Internet Explorer 7

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Windows only: Get a find-as-you-type page search function in Internet Explorer that's almost identical to Firefox's long-touted feature with a free download from programmer Sven Groot. The IE add-on doesn't have much in the way of configuration options, but it adds an inline search bar in-between your address bar and tabs, jumping to words and phrases as you find them and turning red if it can't find the next letter. We've previously featured a similar add-on, but Groot's tool is updated for Vista support, as well as 64-bit downloaders. Find As You Type is a free download for Windows systems only. Find As You Type for Internet Explorer

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Windows only: There are lots of tools out there for "clipping" text and images from web pages for later access, but few of them have the feeling of web clippings' creative predecessor, the scrapbook. Enter Ript, a free download for Windows systems that offers much of the same grabbing functionality as its project-oriented brethren, but does so without any browser extensions and creates an end product with a highly tweak-able layout. Drag images or copy text into the "bin" Ript creates on your desktop, and then double-click to jump to the "table," where you can resize and rotate images and re-format text. The Ript projects can be expanded to several pages, and views of the project exported to JPEG files for further tweaking. If you're the type who regularly attacks their photos with scissors, Ript is likely the best online equivalent to satisfy your DIY drive. Ript is a free download for Windows systems. Ript

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Windows only: You might say that we here at Lifehacker could compile a pretty long list of reasons why we prefer Firefox over Internet Explorer 7—and high up on that list would be the advanced tab functionality, such as being able to re-open closed tabs. IE7 Open Last Closed Tab, a free IE7 add-on that implements two new shortcuts into your browser, does just that. Hit Alt+X to quickly restore a tab, and Alt+Q to pop up a toolbar that lets you choose from a list of your tabs and change the add-on's settings. That it doesn't put a space-hogging permanent toolbar on your browser is a plus, and the Amazon ads shown at the bottom of the Alt+Q page can be disabled. IE7 Open Last Closed Tab is a free add-on available for Windows only. Check out seven IE7 add-ons that don't suck for more functionality and productivity helpers.

IE7 Open Last Closed Tab