Work

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Naming things is hard, especially if the name needs to be unique. Over the years I've worked for sites named Urlesque (rhymes with burlesque, it's about memes), Slacktory (it's a factory for slacking) and Valleywag (which came scarily close to being called "Boomshank"). I always loved the evocative site names of the Gizmodo network. Sploid connotes splatter, tabloids and explosions; Deadspin promises ESPN with an unexpected angle; Kotaku puts the slightest spin on the Japanese term for obsessive nerdy interest. More famous names like Instagram, Medium and Upworthy also compactly convey multiple meanings. The same approach is popular for fictional character names: Darth Vader, Voldemort and Ebenezer Scrooge read immediately as bad guys.

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It can be tricky to move into your dream industry once you've already built your adult life. Maybe you already have an established career. Perhaps you have kids. You might even be stuck in a job you hate, but need it to pay the bills.

But it's not impossible to make a change. You do have options. Course or education providers like Upskilled offer Australians online study options so you can upgrade your career, or perhaps find a new one. All from the comfort of your home. Here's what you need to know.

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Microsoft has reintroduced its Surface Pro hybrid device for professionals. However, this time the company is insisting that the Pro is no longer a tablet that can act as a laptop, but is instead "the most versatile laptop we've ever built".

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There was a time when we thought of prepaid plans as the domain of children and drug dealers, but thanks to a bevy of tiny telcos offering great prepaid rates, the market for these no commitment SIMs is heating up. Here are our picks for prepaid plans with the longest expiry, 10GB of data and under $30 per month.

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Elevator Pitch is a regular feature on Lifehacker where we profile startups and new companies and pick their brains for entrepreneurial advice. This week, we're talking with Will On, co-founder and joint CEO of retail shipping engine Shippit.

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Whether you're doing the office dishes, engaging in impromptu football or just unwinding at the bar, it is often necessary to roll up the sleeves of your dress shirt. Unfortunately, most of us are rubbish at it: either the shirtsleeves are a bulky mess or they constantly fall down your arms. (Sometimes both.) This infographic demonstrates how savvy businessmen do it.

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Good news for graphics enthusiasts: Australian PC builders can now buy NVIDIA’s graphics cards directly from the company, rather than only through its OEM partner. The #1 graphics chipmaker is setting up an online store for customers and it launches today.

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Last week, Tesla announced Australian pre-orders for its solar roof, with installations starting in 2018. The idea is fantastic - replace your house roof with solar tiles that look good, generate power and are even more durable than existing options. But in the real world, is it worth the price? We crunch the numbers to find out.

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You wanted: KFC cooking tips, an NBN technology explainer and an overview of Australia's struggling porn industry. Kick off your Monday by checking out the ten most popular posts from last week.

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We've gotten so used to drag-and-drop working everywhere that when an app refuses to accept an image or document that's clinging desperately to your cursor, it comes as a surprise. The "drag" part of the operation is usually more restricted, except in the case of Google Chrome, where even the download bar is getting in on the action.

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It's a little hard to focus these days. More weird, wild things happened this week than we would expect in a week (month?) of, say, 2015. If you have a creative job or hobby, how do you put the world's happenings out of your mind so you can settle in and create something amazing? Or do you embrace the emotions you're feeling, and feed that fear and anger and sadness into a sort of mental meat grinder that can turn them into something beautiful?

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Twitter introduced an updated privacy policy this week that has users worried about how their private information is being tracked, stored and used. In the policy, the micro-blogging platform announced its plans to discontinue a privacy preference it previously honoured, store your cookies for a longer period of time, and change how Twitter shares your private data.