Tagged With self care

0

If I get into an argument with someone, especially one that shouldn’t affect my life in any real way, I know I’m gonna feel like crap for a while, and that I need to lay low or I’ll make it worse. And now I have the right words for that feeling: An emotional cold.

0

The news cycle is enough to make you lose hope. Every day brings some fresh horror, or an update on an ongoing horror, or rumblings of horrors to come. It’s like being repeatedly smacked in the face with a tetherball. The events of the last couple of years have pushed some of us to be more politically active, which obviously leads to more political awareness... which can lead to despondency. (See tetherball, above.) Activists digging in for the long haul have to learn how to pace themselves and keep their spirits up.

1

Mel Robbins is a motivational speaker and the author of The 5 Second Rule. She’s also the host of the Audible Original, Kick Ass with Mel Robbins. In this episode, we talk about motivation, taming the negative voices in our heads, and how we can kick our own asses to get from good to great.

0

We've all been there — your day is going poorly and it feels like it will never end. Worst of all, it feels like you can't do anything to make it better. But that's not entirely true. This strategy won't solve all of your problems, but it's a creative way to turn a rough day into a fulfilling one.

0

If you've ever been in the hospital recovering from a surgery, you know the health care providers will ask you to "rate" your pain on a scale of one to ten, so they can administer pain relief if you need it. But assessing mental-health distress doesn't have a simple scale, because mental health isn't as straightforward as physical pain.

0

iOS/Android: The urge to self-harm, the Calm Harm app tells us, is like a wave. It's strongest at the beginning, but if you ride the wave, it will soon be over. Apps are no substitute for a good therapist, but people who struggle with these moments of crisis say the right app really helps.

0

The current wave of sexual abuse news is causing thoughtful people everywhere to feel disgust, sadness and rage on behalf of those victimised. But for some of us who have endured such violence, the relentless coverage and subsequent backlash are taking us to an even more disturbing place. Here, we take a look at how survivors are affected and offer insights from mental health professionals and survivors on the best ways to cope.

1

A single morning commute is enough time to gather a thousand seething resentments. People shove you, they litter, they smoke while blocking the footpath. By the time you show up at the office, you might be in full Rorschach-from-Watchmen mode. Instead, fill yourself with the cleansing fire of a kind act.

0

During the early days of new parenthood, my husband once asked me when he got home from work, "Would you be mad if I had parked around the corner before reaching our house, and took a nap?" My initial response to any question of his that begins with "Would you be mad if..." is always DEFINITELY, but after thinking about it, I told him, "No, if that's going to help you be refreshed, present and engaged when you step through the door, then do it."

5

Inspired by games from the 2016 Self-Care Jam (which Kotaku mined for favourites), MetaFilter users recently named their favourite calming video games. Some will be familiar, but others are deep cuts by independent developers. Most aren't for winning or losing, just exploring, interacting and existing. None of them force you to battle other players in a tense show-down. Try these out if you're too stressed out for Overwatch or Plague Inc.