Tagged With science

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Pouring sugar into a car's gas tank is thought to be a petty yet effective means of sabotage. As parodied on The Simpsons, it's the preferred revenge method of estranged (and deranged) spouses and partners.

The idea is that the sugar causes the car's engine to permanently seize up, resulting in a costly trip to the mechanic. The guys at Project Farm recently put this mischievous theory to the test. Here is the video.

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From vitamin C and echinacea to warm clothes and antibacterial soap, there’s no shortage of ideas about how to prevent and manage colds and flu. Unfortunately, many of these are not based on solid scientific evidence. In fact, medical researchers are only starting to unravel the range of factors that affect our susceptibility to getting an infection. Now we have discovered that our body clock plays an important role – making us more prone to get infected at certain times of the day.

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Homo sapiens is a very moody species. Even though sadness and bad moods have always been part of the human experience, we now live in an age that ignores or devalues these feelings. More's the pity. Here's why bad moods are good for you.

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If you've ever thrown a ball or dart, you may have noticed that the harder you throw it the more often you miss your target. Well, a new study suggests that your accuracy is, in fact, directly affected by your throwing speed, and physics is to blame.

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If you're one of the millions of Australians that downs coffee or other caffeinated beverages to get through the work day, here's some good news. A new scientific review on the safety of caffeine says drinking up to four cups of coffee, or about 400mg of caffeine, is pretty safe.

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If you think running is a waste of time, you might want to reconsider. A new study suggests that one hour of running could elongate your life by nearly seven hours, earning you more time than you spend on the activity.

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As linguist and podcast host Daniel Midgley explains at Quartz, making clever protest signs is difficult because you have limited space and your message has to be absorbed quickly (since you'll be moving around). Whatever you'll be protesting, Midgley offers up seven approaches that can help your sign really be seen.

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When you're meeting a dog for the first time, it's hard not to slip into that high-pitched, "goochy-goo" voice people use to talk to babies. A new study suggests puppies actually love that voice, but you might be wasting your breath with older dogs.