Tagged With science

Shared from Gizmodo

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If you've decided, this year, to start working out, you might have noticed a strange phenomenon: You'll leave the gym feeling fine, and then two days later wake up sore. This weird time-lag appears unique to exercise, and is, when you think about it, kind of inexplicable - like stubbing your toe, feeling nothing, and then two days later suddenly yelping in pain. What gives?

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Teenage bullies have more sex than non-bullies, according to reports of a new study. With sexually harassing bullies all over the news and in many of our workplaces, it seems both sad and true that people who abuse and manipulate others would have more sex. But this study tells us more about how teens respond to surveys than about some universal truth of human sexuality.

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Over the past decade, hordes of innocent people have bought the idea that the third Monday of January is the most depressing day of the year – despite there being no scientific evidence to support it. While originally conceived by a PR company, mental health professionals have despaired. That’s because, to many people, the Monday blues is a reality.

This may in part be due to the power of self-fulfilling prophecy. When we hold some expectations about an event, people, or ourselves, we start behaving in a way that matches our expectations.

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Like so many other aspects of female sexuality, the G-spot is typically -- and unfairly -- thought of as mysterious, elusive, and complex. In reality, it's not that complicated. It's a part of a woman's body that -- for some women -- can create a lot of pleasure. End of story. Here's how to find her G-spot, and what to do with it once you do.

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Hair grows back thicker when you shave it! Reading in dim light turns you blind! Peeing on a jellyfish sting will soothe the pain! The way our bodies work is a bit of a mystery, and our desire to unlock its secrets has led to a vast amount of misinformation. Many of these false notions are more widely believed than the truth. We took our healthy scepticism and a bunch of research to find the truth behind some of the most common myths about our bodies and our health. Here's what we learned.

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The story of where we come from evolves almost every year. It's a question many people ask, and the answer is getting more complicated as new evidence is emerging all the time.

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If you need a really last minute gift, try this nerdy card game you can print on card stock and play today. Gut Check, designed by microbiome researcher David Coil, pits your microbes against opponents': you can contract infections, take probiotics and watch antibiotic resistant genes spread through the population.

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Like most people, my knowledge of maths is limited to the skills I need to function in society. (I blame crappy high school teachers for that.) However, the diversity and implications of maths theory is truly fascinating if you're willing to give it a chance. This animated map breaks down the basics.

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For some people spiders have been a source of fear for years. But in reality, they deserve to instil a sense of amazement. There are plenty of reasons to love and not hate spiders, but let's start with just eight.

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On Christmas Day in Australia, fewer people are at their paid employment and more working premises are closed than on any other day in the year. How does this affect demand for electricity, widely seen as fundamentally associated with economic activity?

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If you've ever encountered a "phantom traffic jam" or traffic slowdown that doesn't seem to have an apparent cause, it was probably some jackwagon tailgating somebody. Researchers at MIT found that not only does tailgating not get you anywhere faster, it actually creates traffic jams that shouldn't exist.

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The sighting of a seven-metre shark off the South Australia coast last year excited the world's media with some making reference to the great white that featured in the classic 1975 film Jaws. It was certainly a big shark but there are tales of even bigger beasts lurking in our waters.