Tagged With ios

0

For iOS 11, Apple has completely overhauled the Control Center. The Control Center is that tray that pops up when you swipe up from the bottom of the display on your iPhone or iPad (it will come from the top right side of the screen on the iPhone X). Traditionally, it's offered quick access to things like your phone's Wi-Fi and Bluetooth controls, Aeroplane Mode, the torch and music controls. It's essentially a place for shortcuts to different phone controls and with iOS 11 it's gotten a lot smarter.

0

If you've been using your computer to manage the apps for your iOS device, that time has come to an end. The latest update to Apple's iTunes removes its access to the iOS App Store, as well as the ability to manage iOS apps, with the company expecting you to handle all that app-related business on your iOS device itself. So long, app syncing.

1

Your data, from the Christmas party photos you took last year to the tax return you filed (thank God for extensions, right?) is in more places than you think, which means securing as much of it as you can is vital. But the idea of encryption can be intimidating to the inexperienced, and often involves discussion of more esoteric topics like PGP, decryption keys and other terms with which you may be unfamiliar. Fortunately, iOS and Android make it easy to secure your data and protect it from malicious hackers and anyone looking to extract personal information.

2

iOS 11 is lying to you. Sure, the operating system is full of new features, fixes, and a generally more pleasant aesthetic, but one change is rubbing me (and other battery-conscious users) the wrong way. The revamped Control Center's actions when dealing with the disabling of wireless connectivity are misleading, telling users their Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connections are off when that isn't the case.

0

iOS: Having an elaborate, secure password on your Wi-Fi network can be a great thing. A great thing until that weekend you have guests visiting from out of town and they have to try your 20-character Wi-Fi password a dozen different times because a zero looks like an O or they couldn't tell from your chicken scratch which letters are capitalised and which aren't.

0

iOS: When you're a few hours into your favourite tower defence game, an unwarranted pop-up can break your concentration and end a previously flawless run through a challenging level. Luckily, one of the many updates in iOS 11 is designed to curb the number of pop-ups and interruptions from app developers looking for positive feedback. The new option lets you rid yourself of the dreaded app rating request (or, as I like to call it, the beggar's box).

5

iOS 11 is now available for download, which means you can upgrade one of your many iOS devices to get features such as a smarter Siri, a new app dock on the iPad, and improved multitasking support. It also means you'll be downloading the first version of a major software upgrade, which isn't the best idea, especially on launch day. Issues ranging from slow download speeds to frozen devices often plague the first version of new operating systems, and the potential for something to go awry on day one should be enough to make you consider waiting until Apple irons out the kinks.

0

While there is a lot of hype around the launch of Apple’s new all-glass iPhone X, the attention of consumer lawyers is probably focused in a different direction. In April, the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) alleged that Apple had contravened consumer law by wrongly representing to customers they were not entitled to have a phone defect remedied if their device had previously been fixed by an “unauthorised” repairer.

The action was brought after reports that some consumers who had had their screen repaired by a third party suffered an “error 53”, which disabled their iPhone or iPad, after downloading an iOS update. Given that the new iPhone launched on Tuesday in the US, it’s timely to think about the rights available to Apple fans under Australian law if they suffer that most common of breakages – the shattered screen.

4

If the rumour mill is correct, we could be looking at a $1500 price tag on Apple's new iPhone when it hits stores in a few weeks. And it won't be alone; Samsung's new Note 8 also launches with a $1,499 RRP towards the end of the month.

But you don’t have to spend $1500 on a new phone, of course. There are loads of great options for half the price or less. We've also included a selection of mobile plans for each option!

Shared from Gizmodo

0

How much would you be willing to pay for the iPhone 8? WhistleOut surveyed 1000 Aussies to work out an average price we'd think to be reasonable - and it falls just a bit (okay, a lot) short of the anticipated $1,500 price tag. $920, on average, is what we'd be happy to pay for the new model - $580 less than the expected retail price.

1

The most frustrating thing about a phone addiction is that unlike actual substance abuse, the solution is not to stop using it completely. Instead, we have to find ways to use this technology responsibly, fighting apps overtly designed to steal our time.