Tagged With ios

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In addition to the stress of packing, the stress of making sure you have every electronic device securely stowed somewhere, the stress of remembering every cable you'll need to keep your devices charged during your trip, and the stress of making sure your pets are fed and your plants are watered, there's also the apps.

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I really hate running. I've always hated running. Every time I decide to give running a try (again), I think about how much I'd rather be biking, lifting heavy things, or doing anything else (except squats). However, when I do go running, I use the free C25k app to try and guide me toward longer and better runs.

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Microsoft just updated its Translator app for iOS, Android, and Amazon Fire devices to support new optimised language packs that are (allegedly) up to 23 per cent better at helping you figure out how to say "where is the bathroom" on your next vacation. They also eat up around half as much space on your phone when you download them -- a wise move, since you don't want to be stuck without the ability to ask for directions if you're lost on your travels.

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iOS: Every time you plug your iPhone into a computer, you see the same pop-up on your phone asking if you should "Trust" it. This may seem like a harmless question, but by granting trust to computers, you're essentially giving them access to everything on your iPhone, including photos, videos, contacts and "other content".

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The Kindle app lets you read your ebooks purchased on Amazon, of course, but it has other useful functions you might not know about. Things like creating flashcards to help you study, importing free classic books to read, and saving articles to read offline later.

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Apple doesn't make it easy to figure out what apps you've subscribed to on iOS — go figure. In fact, just remembering where to go to see your subscriptions (and cancel them, if need be) usually requires a trip to your favourite search engine. Or, at least, it did.

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If you want to do anything with your smartphone beyond the basics, there's no reason not to go Android. So, as someone who has not only owned some form of hand-built computer since age 15, but worked at a PC enthusiast magazine for five years — including being editor of the darn thing — why on Earth am I using an iPhone 5s and before that, an iPhone 4? It's complicated... but also not.

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iOS: The red notification badges that pepper our iPhone home screens are mostly useful, but sometimes they can be downright annoying. For example, you're probably sick of seeing that ugly red dot sitting on your iPhone Settings app, a permanent reminder that it's time to set up Apple Pay. Thankfully, there's a simple solution hiding in plain sight - if you don't want to (or can't) link your credit card to Apple Pay.

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iOS: Making GIFs yourself has always been a pretty involved process either made too simple to suit my desires or too complicated to be intuitive. GIF Toaster blends the best of both worlds, offering more than enough control over the GIFs you're trying to create in an interface that's simple to use and free of ads (if you pay).

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The problem with using a picture of your significant other as your phone wallpaper is that it's awkward to ever change it away. Luckily my wife just changed her lock screen from a photo of me to a photo of a baby we like, so I'm changing mine to one of the cool maps offered by Alvar Carto.

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I learned how to play the piano the old-fashioned way -- by being dragged by my mother to weekly lessons taught by an elderly woman in the neighbourhood, and yawning at the sheet music as my kid-fingers played a clunky rendition of Für Elise. Since then, music instruction has evolved. There has been a crop of video game apps that introduce children to instruments such as the piano, guitar, drums and ukulele and through fun challenges, get them to practice -- willingly.

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Earlier this month Google made Google Lens available for non-Pixel Android devices, and this week it's finally started rolling the feature out to iOS devices like your iPhone and iPad as well.

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iOS: Staring at bright screens - especially at night - can be a pain in the butt and/or eyes. And it's difficult to resist the temptation for "just one more video..." when you're settling down for the evening. Thankfully, Google just updated the YouTube app for iOS to include the same kind of "Dark Mode" you'll find on its web site, which should make your evening cat video binges a little easier.