Tagged With exploit

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If an attacker manages to access your D-Link router’s login screen, and your router is old enough, it’s possible that they can take control of the router, inject it with code, and use it to attack other connected systems and devices. And the best part? D-Link is fully aware of these issues, but it isn’t planning to fix the affected routers because they are too old.

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Amazon and Google’s smart speakers both allow you to supplement them with extensions of sorts, the same way you install third-party add-ons to make your web browsing experience even better. Here’s the kicker: As with browser add-ons, you’re entirely at the mercy of a developer. And should they use their powers for evil, you could be giving up everything you’re saying to your device to some random person.

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Mac users take heed: A recently disclosed vulnerability present in the macOS Gatekeeper—otherwise known as the “Cavallarin” exploit—has reportedly been leveraged by adware creators. It’s times like these when we’re reminded of the best advice for keeping your Mac protected from these kinds of issues: When in doubt, install apps from the Mac App Store or trusted third-party sources, not just any ol’ thing you found on the internet.

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Exploit kits have been around for years and cybercriminals are constantly working to make them better and faster at taking advantage of security vulnerabilities so they can infiltrate computing devices to do all sorts of nasty things. The sophistication at which exploit kits now operate at is alarming. Today, we take a look at just what modern exploit kits are capable of and steps individuals and organisations can take to avoid falling victim to them.