Tagged With environment

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Solar power is becoming an increasingly popular investment in Australia. Last year, more than 9500 solar panels were installed each day on average. However, there is still a lot of information out there about solar, particularly when it comes to upkeep, reliability and cost. Here are five myths that prospective first-time buyers need to know.

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The plastic bag ban by the major supermarkets (and Coles’ pivot away from its ban after backlash, then pivot back to the ban after a backlash to the backlash) has left plenty of people scratching their heads.

What are the best replacements for single-use plastic bags? Given that reusable bags are much sturdier, how many times must we use them to compensate for their larger environmental impact?

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We’re so used to using computers and phones that they feel like an extension of our brains — it isn’t just me, right? A Google query comes back as fast as a thought, and the information at my fingertips feels intangible like the information in my brain.

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Even if you regularly eschew meat-eating and take public transportation, all your efforts at reducing your carbon footprint can be easily outweighed by indulging in one of the other biggest individual contributions to climate change: Flying. Most advice on lowering your carbon footprint notes that flying is bad, and stops there. But The New York Times has some more specific guidelines on how to pick and choose your air travel.

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In a continuing campaign against single-use plastic, Woolworths has announced it will discontinue sales of plastic straws from the end of the year. It's a great step forward for environmentalism, but what does it mean for people who rely on straws for medical reasons, or just prefer it with their weekend cocktails? Here are some alternatives.

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Do you have a few unused mobile phones gathering dust in your house somewhere? You're not alone: it is estimated that Australians are holding onto more than 23 million unused phones. All of these products contain valuable materials that could be returned to the supply chain via recycling. Here are seven expert tips for getting rid of unwanted e-waste in ways that will help the planet.

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Feeding wild birds in your backyard can be an exciting yet soothing experience - especially if you have small kids in tow. However, have you ever wondered if what you're doing is legal? Here are the rules (and warnings) you need to know about.

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Urban greening projects in Melbourne’s west are contributing to making the region cooler, more pleasant and healthier to live in and travel through. The key to this success is the Greening the West initiative. Since 2011 this has brought together 23 organisations that, by the end of 2018, will have collectively planted more than 1 million trees in Melbourne’s west.

The program’s efforts not only offer clear health and economic benefits for the region’s residents, but are also welcome news in the face of reports that tree canopy cover in Australian cities is generally declining.

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There is about a tonne of plastic for each person living in the world today -- that's 8300 million tonnes of plastic produced since 1950, most of which has become waste and ended up in landfills. Even worse, plastic production is increasing and half of all the plastic on Earth was created in the past 13 years. But you can reduce your own impact by cutting back your plastic consumption. Here are eight steps you could take.

Shared from Gizmodo

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There's no doubt that if we're going to stop or even slow down climate change, we have to get our collective crap together. But collective action starts with individual choices, and for all the data-driven decision makers out there, the path forward just got a bit more lucid. A new study in Environmental Research Letters has determined exactly which life choices reduce our carbon footprints the most.

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We knew it was coming, but that hasn't made it any easier to swallow. Today, President Donald Trump announced his intention to withdraw the United States from the Paris climate accord, just as he had promised during the election campaign.

In effect, the world's biggest superpower is walking away from a landmark global agreement to lower greenhouse gas emissions and minimise the harm from climate change. Most experts agree: Pretty much everybody loses.