Tagged With dieting

Shared from Gizmodo

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It's that time of year again - when we are inundated with information about what the next great wellness blogger will be instagramming non-stop as a cure-all for, well, all.

So what do the experts make of this year's biggest trends - hemp, proats, flexatarianism, adaptogens, kanuka and seaweed? I spoke to nutritionist Catherine Saxelby from Foodwatch to find out.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

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The scale is fickle: We lose weight when we pee or when we do a sweaty workout. We gain weight when we eat or drink or put on a sweater. But how much does that kind of fluctuation really impact the numbers we see? I weighed myself 15 times in one day to find out.

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What should you cut out of your diet to be more healthy? Everything. According to the most popular diet books on the market, there's barely a food on Earth that's safe to eat. But what is the actual benefit of these diets? Here's what science has to say.

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Even if your teen needs to lose weight, talking to them constantly about their weight isn't the best strategy to help them to be healthy, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Focusing on weight or appearance can push kids toward eating disorders. Instead, it's better to forget about the scale and just help your kid to develop healthy habits.

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If you always feel ravenous after you get out of a pool, rest assured -- it's not just you. Exercise works up an appetite, but swimming is extra hunger-inducing because it cools down your body.

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Depending on who you ask, we're either eating "too much" protein, or we need protein shake after protein shake just to build a little muscle or lose weight. The truth isn't either of these. Some of us may need more, while others get more than enough -- but more isn't necessarily harmful. Here's how to figure it all out.

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You can meticulously count every single Jelly Bean or lick of peanut butter you've had, then calculate the number of calories you've burned to offset them. But this actually hurts your weight loss efforts (and sanity) more than it helps. Here's why you shouldn't rely on "calories in" and "calories out".