Tagged With reading

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My 6-year-old and I have been enjoying a children’s book series called “You Read to Me, I’ll Read to You.” These books are formatted for two people to take turns reading different parts, like a script. We sit side-by-side, playing different characters and doing all the silly voices (I’m expecting a nod from the Academy for my role as the Big Bad Wolf). It’s been fun, and it got me thinking that eventually, we should start reading real scripts.

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You've seen the boxes around your neighbourhood. Many look like one-room schoolhouses. Others look like mini replicas of their owners' homes. Since 2010, book lovers have set up more than 60,000 Little Free Libraries in 80-plus countries across the world, designed simply to be free exchanges that, according to Margret Aldrich, a media and programming representative with LFL, "inspire a love of reading, build community, and spark creativity."

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We all need a little area where we can decompress after a long day, when we’re in a bad mood or when we just need a little alone time. For you, that might mean relaxing in a hot bath or reading a book in your favourite quiet spot. For kids, a dedicated calming area can be an oasis amid overstimulation, power struggles and sibling rivalry.

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A reading survey by Scholastic revealed something they’re calling the “decline by nine.” According to the report, the percentage of kids defined as frequent readers—those who read books for fun five to seven days a week— drops from 57% among 8-year-olds to 35% among 9-year-olds.

Between ages eight and nine, the number of kids who say they love reading plummets from 40% to 28%. What happens during this year, and more importantly, what can parents do to keep their young readers reading, willingly?

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I have a few rules for choosing non-fiction books: I won’t read a book promising to reveal the “insider secrets” of an organisation or field. (The author only knows 1 per cent of the secrets, and they’ll oversell them.) If I find a book too broad or challenging, I go down a reading level — or even find a comic book version with a reliable co-author. And I don’t commit the way I do to fiction — sometimes I only need to read one chapter.

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“How do I build a steady reading habit?” asks redditor 6hlooo on r/TrueAskReddit. “I was always the kind of person to read a book and stop reading after a few pages. I know what the benefits of reading are, but I just can’t seem to motivate myself to read consistently. What do I do?”

Redditors answer with great tips for getting into the habit. The secret is in letting yourself read what you like, and taking practical steps to make it easy to pick up a book. Out of 60+ comments, here are the very best.

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New parenthood is equally exciting and overwhelming, joyful and terrifying. There’s no shortage of advice out there: If you search for “parenting books” on Amazon, more than 60,000 results will appear. On one hand, it’s nice to live during a time in which information is so readily available. On the other hand, how would you possibly know where to start?

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I usually have about 90 articles in my Instapaper, and I’m OK with that. I get around to articles a month after everyone stopped talking about them. I look through my queue like it’s a ten-page diner menu, ignoring certain articles for weeks until I finally decide to read or delete.

It could be worse; once I had 500 unread articles. But if your reading list bums you out—if you wish you could declare bankruptcy on Pocket or Instapaper—then you should try the new competitor, Reading Queue.

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In the hallowed words of US poet Gertrude Stein, whoever said "money can't buy you happiness" was shopping at the wrong store. However, building wealth takes a considerable amount of skill - especially if you don't have tons of disposable income.

These personal finance books provide strategies for everything from creating a budget, to clawing your way out of debt, to teaching your kids how to be wealthy.